About

We Australians love our horseracing and when it comes to lauding our champion gallopers, past and present, we certainly don’t hold back.

When Crisp was recently inducted into the Australian Racing Hall Of Fame, I thought I’d do a Google search to familiarise myself with his outstanding achievements both here in Australia as well as overseas. Apart from his legendary second placing behind Red Rum in the 1973 English Grand National Steeplechase, I found little else on the rest of Crisp’s career.

Unlike past champions of flat racing, jumps champions of yesteryear appear to be forgotten, and as years turn into decades, so too their memories become more distant. In my opinion, there are five jumps horses in Australia that can arguably be termed ‘Champions’ – Crisp, Redditch, Mosstrooper, Roisel and Redleap. These hugely popular horses of their day carried massive weights over towering obstacles, winning by enormous margins.

They all survived the jumps bar one, Redditch.

This blog has been set-up to remember and acknowledge the deeds of these five champions. I have spent many hundreds of hours researching and piecing together the careers of these great horses. I have listed the details of every one of their career starts over the hurdles and steeple fences with newspaper commentaries of the races, where possible. I have credited the sources of the commentaries that I’ve used. I’ve also included my own writings on events that occurred throughout their jumping careers.

This is my own small way of ensuring that these largely forgotten heroes get their identity back, and that they can be remembered and acknowledged for what they were – Champions.

The great jumpers, Winterset, Pedro's Pride, Sussex & Daimio have also been added to this blog.

Sunday, 8 June 2014

Crisp


                                                                                         Crisp
                                                  
                              1963 dkb/br g: Rose Argent (GB) – Wheat Germ (GB)
                              Owner: Sir Chester Manifold
                              Trainer: AustraliaD. Judd     England - F. Winter  
                              Died: May 1984 aged 21     Prize-money $38,560
                              Colours: AustYellow, cardinal sleeves and cap.
                              Colours: BritainYellow, cerise sleeves, cerise and white check cap.



                                                                                              




Crisp clears Bechers Brook in the 1973 Grand National Steeplechase



                          Career Highlights


WON 24/01/68 Pakenham: Pakenham Hurdle-14f
WON 28/02/68 Mornington: Redditch Hurdle-14 ½f
WON 09/03/68 Flemington: Pines Hurdle-2miles
WON 05/10/68 Flemington: Bourke Hurdle-16f
WON 16/10/68 Caulfield: Oby Hurdle-16f & 65 yds
WON 19/07/69 Caulfield: Redleap Steeple-16f
WON 26/07/69 Moonee Valley: Hiskens Steeple-2 ½ miles
WON 04/11/69 Flemington: Cup Steeple-16 ½f
WON 27/06/70 Moonee Valley: Melrose Steeple-16f
WON 11/07/70 Flemington: Footscray Steeple-16 ½f
WON 25/07/70 Moonee Valley: Hiskens Steeple-2 ½ miles
WON 11/03/71 Wincanton: Broadstone Handicap Steeplechase-2 miles
WON 16/03/71 Cheltenham: National Hunt Champion Steeplechase-2 miles
WON 27/10/71 Ascot: Top Rank Club Steeplechase-2 miles
WON 16/11/71 Nottingham: Colwick Cup-2 miles 6f
WON 04/02/72 Sandown Park: Gainsborough Steeple-3 miles 118yds
WON 26/02/72 Kempton Park: Yellow Pages Coventry Pattern Chase-3 miles
WON 03/03/73 Newbury: Geoffrey Gilbey Steeple-2 ½ miles
WON 27/10/73 Newbury: Hermitage Chase-2 miles 4f
WON 10/11/73 Doncaster: Pattern Chase-3 ¼ miles

2nd 18/01/68 Kyneton: Kyneton Hurdle-14f
2nd 05/11/68 Flemington: Cup Hurdle-16f
2nd 16/11/68 Sandown: Highway Hurdle-16f
2nd 23/05/70 Caulfield: Gordon Steeple-16f
2nd 06/11/71 Sandown Park: Pattern Chase-2miles 18yds
2nd 14/02/73 Ascot: Whitbread Trial Hcp Steeple-3 miles
2nd 31/03/73 Aintree: Grand National Steeplechase-4 miles 3 ½f

3rd 13/03/73 Cheltenham: National Hunt Champion Steeplechase-2 miles
3rd 17/10/73 Worcester: Battenhall Hurdle-2 miles
3rd 04/01/75 Haydock: Great Lancashire Chase-3 miles






Crisp was bred by Sir Thomas Chester Manifold (1897-1979) at Talindert, his sprawling country estate at Camperdown in Victoria.
Sir Chester was a racing man through and through. He was a member of the V.R.C. committee from 1937 to 1962, serving the last nine years as chairman.
He was knighted in 1953 and was among the first inductees to be honoured in Australia’s Racing Hall Of Fame when it was established in 2001.

During his years on the V.R.C. commitee, Sir Chester became increasingly concerned at the rise in illegal off-course wagering through SP bookmakers, and the negative effect it was having on the prosperity of the racing industry.
In order to combat this threat, Sir Chester began lobbying for the legalisation of off-course betting agencies.
In 1958, the Victorian government passed legislation that allowed the operation of TAB agencies, but would not fund them, so, in his capacity as chairman of the V.R.C. and with a bank loan of £10,000, Sir Chester set-up the TAB himself. The first TAB outlets started operating in Victoria in March 1961 and through his efforts in establishing them, Sir Chester came to be known as the ‘Father of the TAB’ and served as its first chairman from 1962 to 1968.

When Sir Chester bred Crisp, he was hopeful the son of Rose Argent and Wheat Germ would develop into a top-class galloper, after all, Sir Chester was no stranger to owning top class horses. He won the 1953 Australian Cup with his classy stayer, Arbroath and three years later watched his wife and daughter lead-in their two year old colt, Misting, as winner of the Lightning Stakes. Leave and Dunsinane were also top class stakes winning gallopers who carried Sir Chester’s colours to victory.

As it turned out, Crisp gave Sir Chester very little to get excited about in the early years of his career.
Crisp’s career began in country Victoria. He had two starts (Bacchus Marsh & Casterton) as a two year old where he was hopelessly outclassed on both occasions. He started his three year old season no better than he’d ended his two year old season, failing badly over a mile in a Newstead maiden. He turned his form around at his next start, winning over 1 ½ miles at Woodend before rounding off his three year old season with failures at Geelong and Moonee Valley.
Returning to racing in late ’67 as a four year old, Crisp had two starts at Caulfield, failing badly in both races.
Crisp seemed too one-paced, he lacked that turn of foot needed to finish off a race.  

Watching Crisp finish down the track on those four successive occasions, his trainer, Des Judd advised Sir Chester Manifold to call it quits with the black gelding and turn him out to Talindert, as he was too slow to persevere with.
Rather than giving-up on Crisp, Sir Chester suggested they try Crisp over the jumps, after all, he didn’t seem to have any problem staying, so the jumps might suit him, Judd agreed, and Crisp’s jumping career began.
Crisp's third start as a four year old was at Kyneton, where, in his first attempt at the hurdles, he was beaten a head by Silmac. The performance was encouraging and confirmed to Sir Chester and Judd that the decision to try Crisp over the jumps was the right one, and they just might have a talented  jumper on their hands.




         Complete Jumps Record

41 Starts - 20 Wins 7 Seconds 3 Thirds 



                         4YO







2nd 18/01/68 Kyneton: Kyneton Hurdle-14f
12 ran - 9.9 (3/1) T. Doyle
1st Silmac 9.13 (2/1F) R. Kitchin – 3rd Candy King 9.8 (7/2) I. Kity.
Hd x 2 ½ len. Time 3:07.4 



WON 24/01/68 Pakenham: Pakenham Hurdle-14f
8 ran - 9.7 (8/11) R. Hall
2nd Nintoku 9.6 (3/1) B. Atwell – 3rd Tarifa 9.5 (33/1) F. Grentell.
5 len x 25 len. Time 3:06.0



WON 28/02/68 Mornington: Redditch Hurdle-14 ½f
9 ran - 10.0 (4/9F) R. Hall
2nd Orderly 9.6 (33/1) B. Carson – 3rd The Fox 9.12 (4/1) E. Byrne.
8 len x ½ len. Time 3:20.0



WON 9/03/68 Flemington: Pines Hurdle-2miles
8 ran - 9.11 (1/2) R. Hall
2nd Starula 10.1 (8/1) T. McGinley – 3rd Nickalaska 9.9 (16/1) E. Anderson.
1 ¼ len x 2 ½ len. Time 3:33.8.
Crisp records his first city win but had to survive a protest by Starula’s jockey Tom McGinley for alleged interference over the last 80 yards. Ironic that McGinley would later become Crisp’s regular rider.
     

                                        5YO              




WON 5/10/68 Flemington: Bourke Hurdle-16f
10 ran - 10.3 (5/4F) R. Hall
2nd Subdivider 9.11 (12/1) J. Williams – 3rd Strong Port 9.8 (8/1) T. Jones.
5 len x 12 len. Time 3:34.4  
After three unplaced runs (Caulfield, Yarra Glen and Flemington) on the flat, Crisp is back over the hurdles, back in town and back in business with an easy five length win over Subdivider.




Crisp jumping brilliantly with Ron Hall aboard in the Bourke Hurdle at Flemington


WON 16/10/68 Caulfield: Oby Hurdle-16f & 65 yds
8 ran - 10.10 (4/5F) R. Hall
2nd Subdivider 9.12 (10/1) J. Williams – 3rd Pal Tinta 11.6 (6/1) G. Smith.
2 len x 20 len. Time 3:38.1
Crisp was up in both class and weight from his Flemington win less than two weeks ago, but with four wins and a second from five starts over the hurdles, punters put their faith in the rising star and sent him out an odds-on favourite. Classy South Australian jumper Pal Tinta was Crisp’s main danger, although he’d won his last two at Cheltenham carrying 11.7 and 11.11, he had to concede Crisp 10lb today and found the task beyond him, finishing third, 22 lengths behind Crisp.  


After partnering Crisp to five wins from as many starts over the hurdles, this race would be the last time that Ron Hall would ride the rising star, this was due to an incident that occurred earlier in the year.
Hall was a champion jumps jockey who’d ridden more than 500 winners, he retired to take up training in 1956 but returned to the saddle in 1966 at the age of 43. Hall had weight issues and had to waste constantly to keep his weight down, it was this heavy wasting that would end his association with Crisp. Crisp and Hall were on their way to the barriers at Flemington to take their place in the Fulham Hurdle on February 17 when Hall, who’d been wasting heavily, became ill from severe dehydration. He was taken by ambulance to the course casualty room where he was treated and later recovered. Crisp, who was a firm favourite for the race had to be scratched.
Although Ron Hall had four more rides over the hurdles on Crisp after that incident, including this race, Crisp’s connections didn’t want the worry of it happening again, so they replaced Hall with J. Williams. Williams rode Crisp at his next two hurdle starts and was beaten on both occasions, he was then replaced by Tom McGinley who became Crisp’s regular jumps rider for the rest of his Australian career.






2nd 5/11/68 Flemington: Cup Hurdle-16f
8 ran - 10.7 (7/2) J. Williams
1st Embason 10.1 (3/1F) E. Byrne - 3rd Ormesson 9.0 (8/1) G. Neal.
4 len x ½ hd. Time 3:32.3 (course record)
Crisp, with new rider J. Williams in the saddle finishes second in the Cup hurdle on Melbourne Cup day.
                                                                   




2nd 16/11/68 Sandown: Highway Hurdle-16f
7 ran - 11.2 (5/2EF) J. Williams
1st Le Marjon 9.8 (5/2EF) E. Byrne – 3rd Rhythm Gold 10.3 (12/1) G. Campbell.
6 len x 6 len. Time 3:38.3
Crisp and Le Marjon started equal favourites and ran the quinella with Crisp a well beaten second.
Crisp’s next five starts were on the flat, in four of those races he was unplaced (Caulfield twice, Geelong and Flemington) but he had an easy win with Brian Gilders aboard in the Mt Alexander Encourage over 13f at Moonee Valley where he was sent out a 5/2 favourite.




Crisp’s return to racing for the new jumps season was delayed due to a serious infection that had developed in his off-foreleg. Connections were puzzled as to the cause of the infection as there was no visible sign of any cuts or scrapes that may have triggered the infection.
Crisp’s training program was severely disrupted due to this infection, causing him to miss the Grand National Steeplechase at Flemington. 




                   
WON 19/07/69 Caulfield: Redleap Steeple-16f
6 ran - 10.9 (1-1F) T. McGinley
2nd Carnaby 9.10 (8/1) B. Hillis - 3rd Guess Again 9.3 (9/2) E. Byrne.
30 len x 6 len. Time 3:43.8 
The Redleap Steeple was a race of ‘Firsts’ for Crisp. It was his first start as a Steeplechaser, it was the first time that Des Judd had saddled-up a runner in a steeple event and it was Tom McGinley’s first ride on Crisp, so, it’s not surprising that Crisp was first past the post.  Crisp was sent out an even money favourite and never gave his supporters a moments’ concern. After jumping the first fence with the 16/1 chance Triogent, Crisp then took control and as the race progressed, so did Crisp’s lead widen. At the post he had thirty lengths to spare over the New Zealander Carnaby, who was having his first start in Australia, Guess Again finished third. 



Tom McGinley


WON 26/07/69 Moonee Valley: Hiskens Steeple-2 ½ miles
7 ran - 11.0 (15/8) T. McGinley
2nd Carnaby 9.8 (6/1) B. Hillis – 3rd Junction Lass 9.1 (25/1) C. White.
20 len x 20 len. Time 4:55.0


Crisp shows his effortless style in winning the Hiskens Steeple at the Valley























Crisp lined up against 6 rivals in the A.V. Hiskens Steeplechase over 2 ½ miles at Moonee Valley. Punters were split as to who to send out favourite for the event and when they jumped, Summer Flight at 7/4 just shaded Crisp at 15/8.
Both jumpers were coming into the Hiskens on the back of outstanding form. Summer Flight had smashed the race record by 5 ½ sec in the Grand National Steeplechase (3m 1f) at Flemington a fortnight earlier, while Crisp, first-up after an injury setback had streeted the opposition by thirty lengths in the Redleap Steeple (16f) at Caulfield just seven days previous.
It promised to be a classic duel and 25,000 turned-up at the Valley to see it.
Punters turned a blind eye to the fact that Summer Flight was up 17 lbs on his Flemington win, he also had a very heavy track to contend with, not to mention, Crisp.
Those who took the 7/4 about Summer Flight didn’t get much of a run for their money as the favourite was gone with half mile still to run and only beat one runner home.
The much anticipated ‘duel’ didn’t eventuate, with Crisp leading throughout and giving a flawless exhibition of sustained speed and precision jumping to street the opposition by a widening twenty lengths.
The applause from the large crowd broke out from the time Crisp cleared the last fence and didn’t stop until he’d left the mounting enclosure. Such was the spectacle and atmosphere that day, Crisp’s owner, Sir Chester Manifold said after the race that the win had given him his greatest thrill in fifty years of racing.


6YO





FELL 13/09/69 Flemington: Guildford Steeple-16 ½f
5 ran – 11.9 (4/11F) T. McGinley
1st Blue Bullet 9.4 (7/1) C. Davitt – 2nd Dieppe 9.9 (10/1) N. Rantall
3rd Guess Again 9.6 (12/1) M. Laurence. ¾ len x 8 len. Time 3:51.7 
After a fourth placing over 10 ½ furlongs on the flat at Werribee, Crisp was back at Flemington where he fell for the first and only time in his jumps career. He had won a trial over 16 fences at Flemington on the previous Monday and looked a certainty against a small field of ordinary jumpers. As an 11/4on favourite, bookies were certainly taking no chances with Crisp and punters were happy to take the short odds on what seemed a ‘Good thing’.
Crisp had already opened up a 20 length lead as he approached the third fence, he jumped it badly and fell heavily on landing. Luckily, both Crisp and his jockey Tom McGinley escaped serious injury.
Blue Bullet, who was trailing Crisp when he fell, now found himself with a good lead on the rest of the field and went on to win the race.






WON 4/11/69 Flemington: Cup Steeple-16 ½f
9 ran - 11.9 (4/9F) T. McGinley
2nd Blue Bullet 10.2 (12/1) C. Davitt – 3rd Beau Dallo 9.7 (20/1) K. Bourke.
 10 len x 4 len. Time 3:46.0 (course record)  
Crisp made amends for the fall at his previous start in the Guildford Steeple when a long odds-on favourite, by winning the Cup Steeple by 10 lengths in record time from the Guildford winner, Blue Bullet.
  

                                          
2nd 23/05/70 Caulfield: Gordon Steeple-16f
12 ran - 12.0 (6/4F) T. McGinley
1st Buckshot 9.0 (14/1) G. Brunsdon – 3rd Honest 9.0 (50/1) D. Moore.
6 len x 5 len. Time 3:43.5 
Although first-up for more than six months and carrying 12 stone on a heavy track, Crisp is still the public elect at 6/4. Punters who took the 6/4 were on good terms with themselves as Crisp passed the half-mile with a comfortable lead. Nearing the home-turn, Crisp started to weaken and was easily passed in the straight by Buckshot who carried three stone less.

  

4th 6/06/70 Caulfield Roisel Steeple-16f
7 ran - 11.13 (10/9F) T. McGinley
1st Vansborough 9.13 (4/1) K. Bourke – 2nd Bankstown 10.8 (7/2) E. Byrne
3rd Lots Of Time 11.8 (8/1) K. Wynne. Sh ½ hd x 6 len. Time 3:39.8



WON 27/06/70 Moonee Valley: Melrose Steeple-16f
10 ran - 11.11 (6/4F) T. McGinley
2nd Helphar 9.0 (20/1) I. MacDonald – 3rd Bataan 9.12 (10/1) F. Forbes.
1 ½ len x 2 len. Time 4:04.9 



WON 11/07/70 Flemington: Footscray Steeple-16 ½f
10 ran - 12.3 (2/1F) T. McGinley
2nd Mission 10.8 (9/2) K. Bourke – 3rd Discus 9.12 (15/1) K. Wynne.
5 len x 1 ½ len. Time 3:58.3  

In the Footscray Steeple, Crisp gave those at Flemington that day something to remember when he made, arguably, the biggest leap ever seen on an Australian racecourse. Lindsay Mudge from the Melbourne Age wrote: Veteran racing men who remember many of the former star fencers said they rated Crisp’s incredible jump as the best they had seen. Crisp took-off so far back from the last fence in the lane, the first time around that it seemed certain he would land on top of it.
But the gelding soared over it and retained his footing after being down almost on his nose.
Then to really prove his greatness, Crisp went to the front with his big weight of 12.3 and led all the way to win by five lengths from Mission.
Owner, Sir Chester Manifold, said he was amazed that Crisp cleared the fence “It was a fantastic leap and I still can’t understand how he kept his footing on the other side” he said.







WON 25/07/70 Moonee Valley: Hiskens Steeple-2 ½ miles
11 ran - 12.0 (9/4F) T. McGinley
2nd Mission 10.6 (5/1) M. Laurence – 3rd Goldfreux 9.1 (66/1) C. White.
12 len x ½ len. Time 4:41.0 (course record)


Crisp and Tom McGinley making it back to back wins in the Hiskens Steeple

Crisp was back at Moonee Valley for the A.V. Hiskens Steeplechase, he had won his last two starts and was shooting for three straight, as well as back to back Hiskens Steeples, though he was carrying a stone more than last year.
Crisp was the public elect at 9/4 over Lots Of Time at 4/1 and Mission at 5/1.
Lots Of Time had been in outstanding form as a hurdler the previous season where he won a record nine consecutive races over the hurdles, this was his first season over the steeples and he’d finished a gallant second to Mission at Caulfield the week previous. Mission finished a well beaten second to Crisp a fortnight earlier at Flemington, so the 9/4 odds on offer for Crisp seemed pretty generous.
Sadly, the Hiskens would be Lots Of Time’s last race, the popular jumper fell during the race and had to be destroyed, another much admired jumper, The Fox, also fell, and, like Lots Of Time, could not be saved.
Crisp led from the start in the Hiskens and with six furlongs to go, his rider Tom McGinley, let Crisp stretch out, Crisp easily put a dozen lengths on his opposition and maintained that margin to the post. Mission finished second, with the 66/1 outsider Goldfreux a half-length behind him in third place.
Crisp's winning margin of 12 lengths only told half the story of his Hiskens triumph, the other half was told when his time was posted, it showed that he'd smashed the course record by more than 11 seconds.

The Hiskens Steeplechase would be Crisp's last start over the fences on Australian soil. Crisp was virtually 'weighted-out' of racing in Australia and Sir Chester wasn't prepared to risk his champion with the crippling burdens he was being asked to carry.
Sir Chester entered Crisp for the Broadmeadows Steeplechase at Moonee Valley a few weeks after his Hiskens win, but when he saw that Crisp had been  allotted 12.13 (82kg) for the race, he scratched him. Sir Chester realised that if Crisp was to continue racing, it would have to be overseas.
"If I continue to race Crisp with those sorts of weights he will eventually fall and probably kill himself.
"I don't intend to see such a great horse crucified because there aren't enough races with a 12.7 maximum" he said.  

                                             

7YO 
                                                    






7th 14/11/70 Camden, South Carolina. USA: The Colonial Cup-2 miles 6 ½f
22 ran - 11.6. T. McGinley 
1st Top Bid 11.6. J. Aitcheson – 2nd Shadow Brook 11.6. L. O’Brien
3rd Jaunty 11.4. R. McDonald (Non-Betting Race) 1 ½ len x 1 ½ len. Time 5:20.0 
Crisp, along with eight other foreign gallopers from five nations was invited to race in the inaugural running of the $US100,000 Colonial Cup, a steeplechase over 17 fences at Camden, South Carolina.
On Friday October 9, Crisp made the flight from Melbourne to America with his jockey, Tom McGinley and strapper, Maurice Peckitt. Trainer Des Judd and owner, Sir Chester Manifold arrived later to supervise final preparations.
Crisp led the big field of 22 runners from the jump but was challenged and headed at the first fence by Peach II who led the field over the next two fences. Crisp joined Peach II at the fourth and they jumped it together, challenging each other for the next two fences. Crisp then shook-off Peach II who couldn’t keep the pace going and strode out to lead outright.
Crisp led them down the back stretch for the final time but was caught as they entered the straight and faded to finish seventh.
None of the overseas runners figured in the finish, with U.S gallopers finishing first, second and third. Best of the international brigade was the Irish jumper L’Escargot, who finished fourth. 





Crisp, looking for the lead after the first fence in the Colonial Cup at Camden, South Carolina
















While Crisp was in the U.S preparing for his assignment in the Colonial Cup, plans were being put in place for a campaign in England, with the prestigious Cheltenham Gold Cup paramount on the Aussie champ’s agenda.                              
Des Judd had originally wanted to send Crisp to the Epsom stables of former champion Australian jockey Scobie Breasley, who was now training in England, but Breasley only trained for flat racing and didn’t have the facilities to train a jumps horse.
Breasley was happy to help secure a suitable trainer to oversee Crisp’s British campaign and suggested specialist jumps trainer, Fred Winter as the ideal candidate. Winter was one of the top National Hunt trainers in the country and trained a large team of more than forty jumpers at his stables at Lambourn, in Berkshire
Fred Winter welcomed the opportunity to train Crisp, and so, the stage was set for the Aussie champion’s assault on English jumps racing.









WON 11/03/71 Wincanton: Broadstone Handicap Steeplechase-2 miles
12 ran - 12.7 (2/1) R. Pitman
2nd Black Rod 10.10 (9/1) J. Williams – 3rd Taihape 10.4 (8/1) P. Cowley.
15 len x 2 len. 
The British racing public get their first look at Crisp as he lines up in the Broadstone Handicap Steeplechase over 2 miles at Wincanton. Despite 12.7 and a six month lay-off, Crisp jumped away as the 2/1 favourite and was never worse than fourth in the running. He claimed the leaders at the second last jump and came right away over the concluding stages to win by 15 lengths from Black Rod with Taihape third.



Crisp stretching out before the Broadstone Handicap Steeplechase


WON 16/03/71 Cheltenham: National Hunt Champion Steeplechase-2 miles
8 ran - 12.0 (3/1) P. Kelleway
2nd New Romney 12.0 (20/1) J. Woodman – 3rd Royal Relief 12.0 (13/8F) J. Cook.
25 len x 12 len. 
Despite Crisp’s effortless first-up win at Wincanton, punters sent Royal Relief out the favourite at 13/8 for the National Hunt Champion Steeplechase over 2 miles at Cheltenham. Paul Kelleway filled-in for Fred Winter’s number one jockey, Richard Pitman who suffered a broken ankle in a race-fall the day after he rode Crisp to victory at Wincanton five days ago.
Crisp carrying 12 stone made it two wins from two starts in Britain giving his 7 rivals a lesson in jumping with an effortless 25 length win.

If the British racing public were in awe of Crisp’s first win at Wincanton then they were positively gobsmacked at the extent of his devastating 25 length victory at Cheltenham a week later. The following day’s newspapers were glowing in their praise of the Aussie champion. John Lawrence of the Daily Telegraph wrote: “Sir Chester Manifold’s Crisp came from the other side of the world to teach the British jumpers a memorable lesson yesterday.”
Adjusting his style to English conditions as quickly and brilliantly as Don Bradman ever did, he left his rivals standing to come home alone – the rough equivalent I suppose, of a century before lunch at his first appearance at Lords.”
The Daily Sketch reported: “We certainly saw a champion in the shape of Australian ace Crisp, who jumped his rivals silly. “Crisp is still only half acclimatised, so what he will be when he finally gets used to the English weather is difficult to imagine.”

With the National Hunt season coming to a close, Crisp was sent for a well-earned spell.


8YO



WON 27/10/71 Ascot: Top Rank Club Steeplechase-2 miles
5 ran - 11.10 (4/5F) R. Pitman
2nd The Dikler 11.2 (6/1) B. Brogan – 3rd Master Eye 11.6 (8/1) J. Cook.
6 len x 3 len. 
Crisp’s first start for the new National Hunt Season is the Top Rank Club Steeplechase over 2 miles at Ascot. Crisp carrying 11.10 starts an odds-on favourite and wins his first-up assignment by six lengths from The Dikler with Master Eye three lengths away in third place. Despite the winning margin, it was not an easy win for the top-weight who had to be ridden hard between the last two jumps to shake-off the opposition.
Bookmakers were obviously impressed though, installing Crisp as the 4/1 favourite for the Cheltenham Gold Cup which is the highlight of the big Cheltenham carnival in March the following year.

                         

2nd 6/11/71 Sandown Park: Pattern Chase-2miles 18yds
4 ran - 11.10 (2/7F) R. Pitman
1st Black Magic 11.10 (5/1) R. Dennard– 3rd The Laird 11.10 (20/1) J. King.
2 len x 15 len Time: 3:51.6 (course record) 
Crisp suffered his first defeat in England in the Pattern Chase over 2miles 18yds at Sandown as he finished second to the Queen-Mother owned Black Magic. Black Magic is a top-class performer who won five consecutive races over the steeples the previous year, so, it was no disgrace for Crisp to be beaten, in course-record time, by a horse of Black Magic’s calibre. Crisp stumbled at the fourth fence and had to make up the ground he lost, he closed fast on Black Magic over the concluding stages but could not peg him back, going down by two lengths at the finish. Fred Winter was disappointed at the loss but offered no excuses “He was beaten fairly and squarely” he said after the race “But he was staying on better than any of the others” he added.




WON 16/11/71 Nottingham: Colwick Cup-2 miles 6f
3 ran - 12.0 (1/4F) R. Pitman
2nd Scotch Reel 11.0 (3/1) J. Williams – 3rd Domingo 11.0 (12/1) G. Holmes.
15 lens x 15 len 
Crisp faced his first test beyond 2 miles in the Colwick Cup over 2 ¾ miles at Nottingham and with bookmakers not betting on the three horse race, punters were happy to use the event to gauge Crisp’s stamina over the longer journey. Crisp was lucky not to be knocked out of the race at the first fence. The three runners jumped the first together with Crisp in the centre of the trio, Domingo made contact with Crisp and fell, the contact unbalanced Crisp and had Scotch Reel not been on Crisp’s offside, to keep him upright, Crisp would have gone down as well. Crisp went to the lead after that incident and won as he liked, the official margin was 15 lengths, though Scotch Reel still had two fences to jump when Crisp had already past the post. Domingo’s rider re-mounted after the fall at the first fence and managed to finish the race. 




9th 11/12/71 Cheltenham: Massey Ferguson Gold Cup-2 miles 4f
12 ran - 12.7 (5/1) R. Pitman
1st Leap Frog 12.1 (3/1F) V. O’Brien – 2nd The Dikler 11.2 (9/1) B. Brogan
3rd Titus Oates 12.3 (11/1) R. Barry. Hd x 7 lens 
Crisp, the ‘Black Kangaroo’ as he is now known in England, faced his biggest test when he lined up as topweight with 12.7 in a field of 12 in the Massey Ferguson Gold Cup over 2 miles 4f at Cheltenham. Crisp who was well supported at 5/1 jumped superbly and led the field to the eleventh fence, where he had a slight stumble, this allowed the favourite, Leap Frog, to get on terms with Crisp and take the lead after they’d cleared the twelfth fence.
Crisp couldn’t rally when Pitman went for the whip with 4 furlongs to run and finished in the second half of the field. Leap Frog scored a popular win when he held off The Dikler to score by a head with Titus Oates getting up for third. Leap Frog is trained in Ireland by 73 year old Tom Dreaper who was retiring at the end of the year, Leap Frog was his last starter in England and punters gave both horse and trainer a great reception after the race.




Crisp parades with Richard Pitman up before the Cheltenham Gold Cup



WON 4/02/72 Sandown Park: Gainsborough Steeple-3 miles 118yds
3 ran - 12.0 (11/10F) R. Pitman
2nd Kinloch Brae 11.9 (5/4) J. King – 3rd Plas Iolyn 11.9 (6/1) R. Smith.
12 len x 3 len. 
The real Crisp was on display on this occasion as he completely outclassed his two rivals over the 3 miles 118yds course. Carrying 12 stone, the 11/10 favourite put a gap on his rivals as his jockey Richard Pitman stoked-up the Aussie champ four furlongs from home. Bookmakers reacted quickly to the ease of Crisp’s 12 length win, slashing his odds for the Cheltenham Gold Cup from 10/1 to 6/1.




WON 26/02/72 Kempton Park: Yellow Pages Coventry Pattern Chase-3 miles
5 ran - 12.0 (9/4) R. Pitman
2nd The Dikler 11.8 (2/1F) B. Brogan – 3rd Kinloch Brae 11.1 (8/1) J. Hales.
2 ½  len x 7 len. 


Crisp leads The Dikler over the last in the Coventry Pattern Chase



















Crisp, carrying 12 stone scored an emphatic win in the Yellow Pages Coventry Pattern Chase over 3 miles at Kempton Park. Crisp had to concede weight to proven three-milers, The Dikler and Titus Oakes who were out to test his stamina over the 3 mile course. Grey Sombrero set the pace from the outset while Pitman was happy to bide his time on Crisp at the tail of the small field. With a mile to go, Pitman made his move. Crisp steadily moved passed the early leader Grey Sombrero and with four to jump, joined The Dikler and Titus Oates in the lead. Crisp and The Dikler jumped the second last together and it wasn’t until the last jump that Crisp was able to shake-off The Dikler and start to open up a decisive lead. Crisp went on to win the chase with ease, scoring by two and a half  lengths from The Dikler with Kinloch Brae a further seven lengths away in third place.




5th 16/03/72 Cheltenham: Cheltenham Gold Cup-3 ¼ miles
12 ran - 12.0 (3/1F) R. Pitman
1st Glencaraig Lady 12.0 (6/1) F. Berry – 2nd Royal Toss 12.0 (20/1) 
N. Wakley – 3rd The Dikler 9.12 (10/1) B. Brogan. ¾ len x hd. 
Crisp started the favourite at 3/1 for the Cheltenham Gold Cup over 3 ¼ miles but failed to show his usual dash, finishing fifth of the twelve runners. Crisp was up with the leaders into the last half mile, he jumped the last fence in third place behind The Dikler and Glencaraig Lady but could not quicken when jockey, Pitman put him under pressure in the run to the post.
Irish trained Glencaraig Lady who was always in a forward position won the Gold Cup after a stirring duel with The Dikler over the final half furlong. Royal Toss came with a fast-finishing run to cut The Dikler out of second money, with less than a length covering the first three placegetters.
With the National Hunt season coming to an end, Crisp was sent to the spelling paddock.
                                                 
   
        9YO



 4th 25/10/72 Ascot: Top Rank Club Steeplechase-2 miles
4 ran - 11.10 (4/6F) R. Pitman
1st Straight Fort 11.10 (9/2) E. Wright – 2nd Royal Relief 11.10 (9/2) P. Blacker
3rd Master Eye 11.6 (13/2) B.R. Davies. 3 len x hd. 
As he did last year, Fred Winter picked the Top Rank Club Steeplechase as Crisp’s pipe-opener for the new National Hunt season. Crisp, the odds-on favourite was always at the rear in the four horse field and after blundering at the second-last fence was never a threat, finishing last of the four runners, seven lengths behind the winner, Straight Fort.



2nd 14/02/73 Ascot: Whitbread Trial Hcp Steeple-3 miles
6 ran - 12.1 (5/1) R. Pitman
1st Balinese 11.1 (5/2) A. Turnell – 3rd Rainbow II 10.6 (12/1) B. Brogan.
10 len x 3 len. 
Crisp had been off the course with training problems following his last start failure in the Top Rank Steeplechase last October. This was Crisp’s first outing in almost four months and the top-weight made a promising return to racing with a splendid second to Balinese, who’d won the Wills Premier Chase at Ascot two weeks earlier. Trainer Fred Winter was delighted with Crisp’s performance and said that his stable star would now head to Newbury and then Cheltenham, and later, a possible tilt at the Grand National.



WON 03/03/73 Newbury: Geoffrey Gilbey Steeple-2 ½ miles
9 ran - 12.1 (13/8F) R. Pitman
2nd Credo’s Daughter 10.0 (12/1) C. Read – 3rd Royal Relief 11.6 (6/1) W. Smith. 3 len x 8 len. 
Crisp returned to winning form with an impressive win over the 2 ½ mile course at Newbury. Punters stuck with the Aussie champ on the back of his good second to Balinese at his previous start sending him out the favourite at 13/8.



3rd 13/03/73 Cheltenham: National Hunt Champion Steeplechase-2 miles
6 ran - 12.0 (1/2F) R. Pitman
1st Inkslinger 12.0 (6/1) T. Carberry – 2nd Royal Relief 12.0 (14/1) P. Blacker.
¾ len x 2len. 
Crisp turned in a disappointing performance in finishing third behind the American chaser, Inkslinger and last year’s race winner, Royal Relief. Trainer Fred Winter said after the race “There’s nothing wrong with the horse, but he’s getting older and probably losing his speed.” “Two and a half miles is probably his minimum now.” “The Grand National is still definitely on.”
Bookmakers reacted to Crisp’s defeat by easing his Grand National odds out from 16/1 to 25/1.



2nd 31/03/73 Aintree: Grand National Steeplechase-4 miles 3 ½f
38 ran - 12.0 (9/1EF) R. Pitman
1st Red Rum 10.5 (9/1EF ) B. Fletcher – 3rd L’Escargot 12.0 (11/1) T. Carberry.
¾ len x 25 len. Time 9:01.9 (course record)

Red Rum (8) snatches victory from Crisp in the 1973 Grand National Steeplechase
 As the thirty-eight strong field broke away from the start they were spread from one  side of the track to other. As they  began  to sort themselves out, it was Grey Sombrero, rushing up on the extreme outside, who led them over the first fence.
With a sense of urgency, Grey Sombrero cleared the first and broke away from the leading pack. Crisp, nearer the inside, had also began well and was up looking for the front in the early stages. Grey Sombrero, staying wide out on the course maintained a clear lead for the next four fences, and was still piloting the field as they approached the sixth at Bechers Brook.
At this stage of the race, Crisp had settled in second spot, right behind the leader.
Grey Sombrero blundered slightly at Bechers, causing him to lose ground, this allowed Crisp to claim the front-running and stride out to a three length lead.

Grey Sombrero tried to rally after his blunder and immediately set-out after Crisp, but Crisp was off and running, and jumping brilliantly, he quickly began to lengthen his stride and widen his lead.
By the time they took to the fifteenth at ‘The Chair’ Crisp had opened up a lead of more than a dozen lengths over Grey Sombrero, who fell at that jump. Crisp was now fifteen lengths in front of Endless Folly, who took-over second position from the fallen grey.
Red Rum had worked his way through the field and was now challenging for third position.

Crisp had been completely dominant throughout the first half of the race, he’d carted them along at a fast pace, yet still maintained a comfortable tempo, his rhythm was faultless and his jumping supreme as he led them into the second circuit.
Crisp cleared the seventeenth at Melling Road with a commanding lead of more than twenty lengths, he had the chasers behind him strung-out, and struggling to stay in touch, Crisp was in complete control.

Jumping Bechers for the second time and Crisp was in a race of his own, up to this point, Richard Pitman had barely moved on the big black gelding as he flew the fences with ridiculous ease.
Red Rum is in second, twenty lengths behind Crisp, with a further dozen lengths to the remainder of the field, who are now in a race of their own, for third place.

Crisp was moving with machine-like fluency, his stamina seemed to have no bounds as he effortlessly put the fences and furlongs behind him.
Those watching were spellbound, never before had they seen a horse lead a Grand National so easily, for so long, and by so far, they knew they were witnessing something very special.

Crisp had kept Red Rum chasing hard throughout the race, but as he cleared the third from home, Pitman shows the first sign of concern with a sustained look over his left shoulder. Surveying the situation, Pitman sees only one danger - Red Rum, who’s still more than fifteen lengths away.
Over the second last and Crisp still appears to be doing it easily, but stride by stride, Red Rum is beginning to close the gap, and stride by stride, Crisp begins to feel his twelve stone. 

As Crisp puts the last jump behind him, things seem to change in an instant. Crisp starts to lose momentum. By the time he gets to the ‘elbow’, he’s out on his feet. Crisp begins to wander off the true course that he’d maintained throughout the race. Pitman can see the winning post, it seems so close, yet, at the same time, seems an eternity away, he can hear the cracking whip and thumping hooves of his pursuer, charging up behind him.

In desperation, Pitman makes a decision, a decision that will come back to haunt him for the rest of his life - He goes for the whip.

Richard Pitman gave this account of that fateful decision:
"I made a basic riding error. People have criticised me for going on, making the running, going too fast; I won't accept that, but what I will accept is I made the error that a boy would make. He was drunk on his feet and I thought I've got to wake the old boy up, just bring him out of this reverie, and I picked up my stick in my right hand to give him a couple of wallops, which was totally the wrong thing to do because I wanted to go right-handed to get round the elbow. He went off course, left-handed, and I had to put my stick down, pull him back on course, and lost both momentum and ground.

"When I got to the elbow I gave him another few taps but he was gone, he was lifeless. His legs were going out sideways now, he was in a terrible state."

The free-flowing galloping machine that had captivated his audience for so much of the race was fading fast, the mechanical rhythm of his stride was gone, so too was the unrelenting tempo of the pace that he’d sustained for so long, both had fallen away to a stagger. Crisp was running on empty, he began to toss his head about and lose concentration. With a half furlong to run, Pitman tries  in desperation to rally Crisp for a final effort, but Crisp was giving his all, there was nothing left.

Red Rum seemed to lift over the final stages of the race, or perhaps his finishing run was exaggerated by Crisp’s total capitulation, it was probably a combination of both. In the end, it was Red Rum’s Grand National by three-quarters of a length.

Crisp may have been denied the prize that day, but he certainly wasn’t denied any accolades. As the runners returned to the enclosure the cheering was mostly for Crisp, he had given Red Rum 23lbs that day and led him to the shadows of the post.
They had smashed the course record by almost 20 seconds.
People love a champion and Crisp proved that day, that sometimes, a champion’s greatest performance can be acknowledged, not in victory, but in defeat.

After the race, Crisp’s owner Sir Chester Manifold, who was on course that day, paid the following tribute to his beloved champion:
“I have never seen a horse jump like Crisp, he sailed over the obstacles like a stag and won the hearts of all England.” I have never been so proud of my horse.” he added.
Crisp, did indeed win the hearts of all England that day, and those sentiments were best summed up by the front-page headline in Britain’s Sunday Telegraph, the day after the race  - ‘Red Rum wins, but Crisp is immortal’

Immortal indeed.                                                                                   (R.Donnelly)

                                                                                                   

                                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WK0TzAbIpqk


                                                            The Players






        10YO                                                                    


3rd 17/10/73 Worcester: Battenhall Hurdle-2 miles
13 ran - 11.5 (12/1) R. Pitman
1st True Luck 12.0 (11/8F) K.B. White - 2nd Past Master 12.0 (11/1) 
J. Suthern. 1 ½ len x 1 ½ len. 
Crisp was back over the hurdles in his first run since his Grand National defeat and was in need of the run. Crisp led to two fences out but faded in the run home to finish third.




WON 27/10/73 Newbury: Hermitage Chase-2 miles 4f
6 ran - 11.6 (11/10F) R. Pitman
2nd Clever Scot 11.1 (10/1) D. Mould – 3rd Royal Relief 11.1 (7/1) P. Blacker
10 len x ¾ len (Track Record)





































WON 10/11/73 Doncaster: Pattern Chase-3 ¼ miles
2 ran - 11.10 (4/11F) R. Pitman
2nd Red Rum 11.10 (5/2) B. Fletcher – 8 len. 


   Crisp leads Red Rum over the second last in the Pattern Chase 
























The presence of both Red Rum and Crisp scared off the opposition and turned the Pattern Chase into a match-race between last season’s Grand National winner and runner-up. With both horses carrying 11.10 it meant that Crisp was meeting Red Rum 23 lbs better than when they last met in the Grand National. Both horses had been in top form coming into the race. Crisp had kicked off the new season with a third at Worcester followed by a record breaking win at Newbury at his previous start while Red Rum was undefeated this season having won his last three.
With the level weight advantage, punters rallied behind Crisp and sent him out an odds on favourite. The two great horses kept each other company for most of the race, then, with four fences to jump, Pitman released the brakes on Crisp and the big black gelding took his revenge on Red Rum, running home 8 lengths clear of the Grand National champion.     




















                         
11YO


            6th 7/12/74 Cheltenham: Massey Ferguson Gold Cup-2 miles 4f
9 ran - 12.2 (15/1) R. Pitman
1st Garnashee 10.6 (12/1) G. Mould – 2nd Bruslee 11.2 (6/4F) A. Turnell
3rd Canasta Lad 10.11 (11/1) J. King. 1 ½ len x 6 len.
Crisp returned to racing after more than a year off due to injury. Jockey Richard Pitman was very happy with Crisp’s first-up run saying after the race “Crisp is going to be as good as ever, and that’s very good indeed” Pitman went on to say “He jumped super, simply never put a foot wrong, towards the end he got very tired but that was only to be expected, after such a long lay-off.”



3rd 4/01/75 Haydock: Great Lancashire Chase-3 miles
6 ran - 12.7 (5/2) R. Pitman
1st The Benign Bishop 11.6 (9/4) R.Barry – 2nd Iceman 10.8 (2/1F) K.B. White. 
1 ½ len x 12 len.



P/UP 12/02/75 Ascot: Whitbread Trial Hcp Hurdle-3 miles
13 ran - 12.2 (14/1) R. Pitman
1st Ten Up 11.6 (7/4F) T. Carberry – 2nd Soothsayer 11.13 (13/2) J. Francome
3rd Glandford Briggs 11.7 (7/1) S. Holland. 25 len x ¾ len



4th 20/02/75 Wincanton: Jim Ford Challenge Cup-3 miles 1f
5 ran - 11.11 (4/6F) R. Pitman
1st Kilvulgan 11.11 (13/8) A. Turnell – 2nd Merry Maker 11.11 (10/1) S. May
3rd Highland Abbe 11.11 (20/1) A. Andrews. 15 len x 10 len.



4th 10/04/75 Ascot: Sardan Handicap Chase-2 miles 4f
10 ran - 12.4 (14/1) R. Pitman
1st Game Spirit 12.4 (4/1) W. Smith – 2nd Summerville 11.10 (13/8F) A. Turnell
3rd Maniwaki 10.4 (25/1) R. Linley. 4 lens x 4 lens.



4th 26/04/75 Sandown: Whitbread Gold Cup-3 miles 5f 118 yds
12 ran - 10.13 (9/2) R. Pitman
1st April Seventh 10.0 (16/1) S. Knight – 2nd Captain Christy 12.0 (5/1) R. Coonan
3rd Barona 9.7 (12/1) P. Kelleway. 1 ½ len x 6 len. 
It wasn’t planned that way, but it turned out that the Whitbread Gold Cup was the last time we’d see Crisp race. Crisp sat just off the pace and jumped superbly for one and a half circuits of the Sandown course. When Pitman took him to the front, Crisp seemed back to his best as he dashed clear and headed for home. With 19 fences safely behind him, Crisp approached the second last fence with April Seventh moving up to almost join him. Crisp cleared the second last fence but blundered badly on landing, almost crashing to the turf as his back legs slid out from under him. Crisp quickly recovered but the damage had been done, he’d lost his momentum and now found himself in third place behind April Seventh and Captain Christy. Crisp cleared the last jump easily but the near-fall had taken the wind out of his sails and he could not hold off the fast finishing Barona who cut him out of third placing.

In view of Crisp’s bad blunder in the Whitbread and his year-long injury lay-off after defeating Red Rum at Doncaster, his connections decided not to risk Crisp to the rigours of further racing and jumping, and retired him.
Sir Chester and Fred Winter retired Crisp to the property of Winter’s good friend Capt. John Trotter at East Layton Hall, near Richmond in North Yorkshire.
Crisp became a hunts horse and hunted with Capt. Trotter for the next eight years.
Crisp died in 1984 and was buried beside a small rock wall at East Layton where a rock headstone marks his final resting place. 


‘Red Rum wins, but Crisp is immortal’

                                                     

                                                            Australian Jumps Record
                                                 17 Starts 11 Wins 4 Seconds 0 Thirds 



                                            Overseas Jumps Record
                                   24 Starts 9 Wins 3 seconds 3 thirds          


                                           Career Jumps Record
                                 41 Starts 20 Wins 7 Seconds 3 Thirds 









                                        Complete Career Record
                            59 Starts 22 Wins 7 Seconds 3 Thirds 


                    2YO 

                  10th 16/07/1966 Bacchus Marsh: Second Maiden Plate-6f
                  8th 23/07/1966 Casterton: Dunrobin Improvers H’Cap-6f

                    3YO 

                  7th 6/08/1966 Newstead: Second Maiden H’Cap-1 mile
                  WON 3/06/1967 Woodend: Progressive H’Cap-1 ¼ miles
                  8th 14/06/1967 Geelong: Intermediate H’Cap-11f
                  9th 24/6/1967 Moonee Valley: Ardoch H’Cap-12 ¾f

                   4YO    
                                         
                  10th 26/12/1967 Caulfield: Malvern Welter-1 mile
                  9th 13/01/1968 Caulfield: Selby Highweight-10f
                  2nd 18/01/68 Kyneton: Kyneton Hurdle-14f
                  WON 24/01/68 Pakenham: Pakenham Hurdle-14f
                  WON 28/02/68 Mornington: Redditch Hurdle-14 ½f
                  WON 9/03/68 Flemington: Pines Hurdle-2miles

                                                        5YO

                  15th 24/08/68 Caulfield: Koornang Welter-1 mile
                  4th 5/09/68 Yarra Glen: Second Intermediate H’cap-9 ½ f
                  6th 14/09/68 Flemington: Kingsford Welter-12f
                  WON 5/10/68 Flemington: Bourke Hurdle-16f
                  WON 16/10/68 Caulfield: Oby Hurdle-16f & 65 yds
                  2nd 5/11/68 Flemington: Cup Hurdle-16f
                  2nd 16/11/68 Sandown: Highway Hurdle-16f
                  4th 23/11/68 Caulfield: Ormond Handicap-12f
                  WON 30/11/68 Moonee Valley: Mt Alexander Encourage-13f
                  6th 8/03/69 Flemington: Bourke Welter-8f
                  10th 26/03/69 Geelong: Autumn Handicap-8 ½f
                  9th 7/04/69 Caulfield: Neerim Handicap-12f
                  WON 19/07/69 Caulfield: Redleap Steeple-16f
                  WON 26/07/69 Moonee Valley: Hiskins Steeple-20f                                  

                                                    6YO 

                  4th 3/09/69 Werribee: Patrick Hickey Handicap-10 ½f
                  FELL 13/09/69 Flemington: Guildford Steeple-16 ½f
                  WON 4/11/69 Flemington: Cup Steeple-16 ½f
                  2nd 23/05/70 Caulfield: Gordon Steeple-16f
                  4th 6/06/70 Caulfield Roisel Steeple-16f
                  WON 27/06/70 Moonee Valley: Melrose Steeple-16f
                  WON 11/07/70 Flemington: Footscray Steeple-16 ½f
                  WON 25/07/70 Moonee Valley: Hiskens Steeple-20f 


             7YO 
     
                  8th 5/09/1970 Caulfield: Doona Handicap 12f              
                  7th 14/11/70 Camden, South Carolina. USA: Colonial Cup-2 miles 6 ½f
                  WON 11/03/71 Wincanton: Broadstone Handicap Steeplechase-2 miles
                  WON 17/03/71 Cheltenham: National Hunt Champion Steeplechase-2 miles

                                                  8YO  
     
                 WON 27/10/71 Ascot: Top Rank Club Steeplechase-2 miles
                 2nd 6/11/71 Sandown Park: Pattern Chase-2miles 18yds
                 WON 16/11/71 Nottingham: Colwick Cup-2 miles 6f
                 9th 11/12/71 Cheltenham: Massey Ferguson Gold Cup-2 miles 4f
                 WON 4/02/72 Sandown Park: Gainsborough Steeple-3 miles 118yds
                 WON 26/02/72 Kempton Park: Yellow Pages Coventry Pattern Chase-3 miles
                 5th 16/03/72 Cheltenham: Cheltenham Gold Cup-3 ¼ miles  
                            
                                                  9YO 

                  4th 25/10/72 Ascot: Top Rank Club Steeplechase-2 miles
                  2nd 14/02/73 Ascot: Whitbread Trial Hcp Steeple-3 miles
                  WON 03/03/73 Newbury: Geoffrey Gilbey Steeple-2 ½ miles
                  3rd 13/03/73 Cheltenham: National Hunt Champion Steeplechase-2 miles
                  2nd 31/03/73 Aintree: Grand National Steeplechase-4 miles 3 ½f

                                                                   10YO

                  3rd 17/10/73 Worcester: Battenhall Hurdle-2 miles
                  WON 27/10/73 Newbury: Hermitage Chase-2 miles 4f
                  WON 10/11/73 Doncaster: Pattern Chase-3 ¼ miles    

                                         
                                                                    11YO   
                                   
                  6th 7/12/74 Cheltenham: Massey Ferguson Gold Cup-2 miles 4f
                  3rd 4/01/75 Haydock: Great Lancashire Chase-3 miles
                  P/UP 12/02/75 Ascot: Whitbread Trial Hcp Hurdle-3 miles
                  4th 20/02/75 Wincanton: Jim Ford Challenge Cup-3 miles 1f
                  4th 10/04/75 Ascot: Sardan Handicap Chase-2 miles 4f
                  4th 26/04/75 Sandown: Whitbread Gold Cup-3 miles 5f 118 yds



























4 comments:

  1. Crisp was a truly exhilarating horse to watch. I remember watching the 1973 Grand National on television as a 9 year old being totally mesmerised by Crisp and his wonderful exhibition of jumping skills and willing him to win! It mattered not to me that he came second as to my mind he had already won the race. I absolutely love this horse and the thrill and joy he gave to me that afternoon - 31 March 1973. Unforgettable.

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  2. a great jumper probably our best ,a record without peer as a steeplechaser....well done and tom mginley probably best rider of jumpers we have seeneven better than smith,byrne,hall and hayes

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  3. What crisp did that day was unbelievable history making performance along with red rum a true national hunt champion
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