About

We Australians love our horseracing and when it comes to lauding our champion gallopers, past and present, we certainly don’t hold back.

When Crisp was recently inducted into the Australian Racing Hall Of Fame, I thought I’d do a Google search to familiarise myself with his outstanding achievements both here in Australia as well as overseas. Apart from his legendary second placing behind Red Rum in the 1973 English Grand National Steeplechase, I found little else on the rest of Crisp’s career.

Unlike past champions of flat racing, jumps champions of yesteryear appear to be forgotten, and as years turn into decades, so too their memories become more distant. In my opinion, there are five jumps horses in Australia that can arguably be termed ‘Champions’ – Crisp, Redditch, Mosstrooper, Roisel and Redleap. These hugely popular horses of their day carried massive weights over towering obstacles, winning by enormous margins.

They all survived the jumps bar one, Redditch.

This blog has been set-up to remember and acknowledge the deeds of these five champions. I have spent many hundreds of hours researching and piecing together the careers of these great horses. I have listed the details of every one of their career starts over the hurdles and steeple fences with newspaper commentaries of the races, where possible. I have credited the sources of the commentaries that I’ve used. I’ve also included my own writings on events that occurred throughout their jumping careers.

This is my own small way of ensuring that these largely forgotten heroes get their identity back, and that they can be remembered and acknowledged for what they were – Champions.

The great jumpers, Winterset, Pedro's Pride, Sussex & Daimio have also been added to this blog.

Saturday, 14 June 2014

Mosstrooper

                                       

                                                            

   

                                   Mosstrooper

                             1921 Ch g. Kenilworth – Keego

                            Owner: R. Turnbull – 1921 – Mar 1927
                            Trainer: J. Mulcahy – 1923 – Mar 1927
                            Owner/Trainer G. Powell - Mar 1927 – Retirement
                            Died January 21 1946 aged 24
                            Prizemoney: £14,191

                            Colours: R. Turnbull - Cream, blue sleeves and cap.                                                                             Colours: G. PowellPink, white hoops, black cap.





Mosstrooper - R.N. Harris

                                         
                                                                   

                                           Career Highlights                          
  
                                                                        
               WON 17/05/1928 Bendigo: Brush Steeplechase-2 miles
               WON 25/05/1929 Moonee Valley: Commonwealth Steeplechase-2 miles 8ch
               WON 8/06/1929 Moonee Valley: Brunswick Steeplechase-2 miles 8 ch  
               WON 29/06/1929 Moonee Valley: Travancore Hurdle-2 miles 8ch
               WON 31/07/1929 Aspendale Park: Hurdle Race-2 miles
               WON 3/08/1929 Caulfield: Australian Hurdle-3 ¼ miles 20yd
               WON 10/08/1929 Caulfield: Australian Steeplechase-3 ½ miles
               WON 5/07/1930 Flemington: Grand National Hurdle-3 miles
               WON 12/07/1930 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3miles 1f 
               WON 2/08/1930 Caulfield: Australian Hurdle-3 ¼ miles 20yds
               WON 15/07/1933 Caulfield: Godfrey Watson Steeplechase-2 miles 3f

               2nd 13/07/1929 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3 miles 1f
               2nd 28/06/1930 Williamstown: Port Phillip Hurdle-2 miles
               2nd 17/06/1933 Caulfield: Wanda Steeplechase-2 mils 1 ¾f
               2nd 1/07/1933 Flemington: Kensington Steeplechase-2 miles ½f
               2nd 12/08/1933 Caulfield: Australian Steeplechase-3 ½ miles

               3rd 7/06/1930 Flemington: York Hurdle-2 miles
               3rd 21/06/1930 Caulfield: Toolambool Hurdl-2 miles 65yds
               3rd 4/07/1931 Flemington: Grand National Hurdle-3 miles
               3rd 9/07/1932 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3 miles 1f
               3rd 8/07/1933 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3 miles 1f 
                                       
                                     
                          

Despite having the breeding of a potential Derby winner, Mosstrooper failed to live up to those expectations during his formative years.
He had four starts as a two year old for four unplaced runs, seven starts as a three year old netted him one placing, second in a seven furlong race at Albury.
Mosstrooper had four unsuccessful outings as a four year and fared no better from four starts as a five year old.
Mosstrooper was raced by his breeder, VRC commitee-member Richard Turnbull, who, after three years of disappointment decided to sell the five year old son of Kenilworth.
Mosstrooper was put-up for auction in March 1927 where he was purchased for 200 guineas by well-known horse-dealer and racing identity, Mr. Gus Powell.


(Although Mosstrooper was a major disappointment to him, Richard Turnbull would enjoy his finest moment as an owner/breeder in November 1944 when Sirius won him Australian racing’s greatest prize, The Melbourne Cup.) 


Auction Notice 'The Argus' 7/03/1927
Mr Richard Turnbull














Gus Powell’s property at Lysterfield near Dandenong became Mosstrooper’s new home, and being used as a stock horse by Powell to round-up cattle was his new profession, a far cry from the colour and excitement of the racetrack.

Gus Powell was an accomplished horseman who rode as an amateur from a very early age. He was riding in, and winning, jumps races as a thirteen year old back in the 1880s.
By the mid 1890s Powell had become a successful horse trader both in Australia and abroad, where he’d established a lucrative business selling horses to India.

From the time he bought Mosstrooper, Powell’s intention was to prepare him for a jumping career, so he began personally schooling the big gelding over every open fence around Dandenong and beyond. Powell once said that he’d ridden Mosstrooper over 1000 miles during his time as a hack, while at the same time, moulding him into a skilful and confident jumper.


             Complete Jumps Record

     42 Starts - 11 Wins 5 Seconds 5 Thirds


6YO


5th 14/04/1928 Epsom: Brush Steeplechase-2 miles 6ch
11 ran – 9.5 (33/1) W. Short
1st Dancing Master 9.13 (3/1) H. Thompson - 2nd Ridara 10.13 (4/1) R. Inkson                       
3rd Barbican 10.1 (15/1) A. Trounson. 8 len x 1 ½ len. Time 4:20



4th 12/05/1928 Sandown: Brush Steeplechase-2 ¼ miles
16 ran - 9.5 (5/1) W. Short
1st Dancing Master 10.11 (9/2) H. Bird – 2nd Blarwyn 9.13 (8/1) K. Scott
3rd Derision 10.11 (10/1) W. Foley. 8 len x ½ len. Time 4:27 ½




WON 17/05/1928 Bendigo: Brush Steeplechase-2 miles
7 ran – 9.7 (6/1) W. Short
2nd Royan 10.6 (3/1F) W. Howson – 3rd Brown Amos 10.4 (10/1) D. Wraight.
2 len x 2 len. Time 3:55
Royan, half-brother to Rivoli, was penalised 10 lb in the steeplechase for winning the hurdle race on Wednesday, but this did not prevent him from starting favourite.
Blarwyn was almost as strongly fancied, and there was an unexpected move in favour of Sistrum. There was money too for Tutto Nero and Mosstrooper.
The opening stages of the race were sensational. Tutto Nero crashed into the first obstacle, and sent T. Eva, his pilot rolling over and over for some yards. Sistrum, running third at the time, ran off at the next fence, leaving only five to carry on.
Early Time led into the lane the first time from Royan and Mosstrooper, but the latter dropped back, and the order leaving the straight was Early Time, Royan and Brown Amos, then a gap, with Mosstrooper just ahead of Blarwyn.
Shortly after Royan took the lead and kept it until approaching the home turn, where Brown Amos ran up to him. It looked as if Royan was about to quit, but just as Brown Amos passed him he came again and was the leader at the last jump.
From thence to the end Royan hung-out badly. Mosstrooper, on the contrary, finished boldly, and the verdict was in his favour by two lengths. Brown Amos was a similar distance away third. Blarwyn, who struck heavily seven furlongs from the winning post, was a moderate fourth. (The Age – 18/05/1928)

After contesting 25 races over 4 years, Mosstrooper, having his third start over the hurdles, wins his first race.





FELL 4/06/1928 Randwick: First Steeplechase-2 ¼ miles
18 ran – 9.2 (20/1) A. Trouson
1st Grey Friar 10.3 (5/2F) B. Krieger - 2nd Minterne 11.9 (25/1) E. Kenney
3rd Mendit 10.5 (3/1) W.H. Baker. 8 len x 4 len. Time 4:37



FELL 9/06/1928 Randwick: AJC Club Steeplechase-3 miles
10 ran - 9.1 (25/1) A. Trouson
1st Grey Friar 10.2 (5/4F) B. Krieger - 2nd Perpetual 9.9 (12/1) H. Bennett
3rd Chandonia 9.9 (33/1) L.H. Watson. 6 len x 6 len. Time 6:28



9th 21/07/1928 Caulfield: Leamington Hurdle-2 miles 1f 65yd
14 ran – 9.0 (33/1) T. Tagell
1st Henare 11.3 (9/2EF) H. Cairns – 2nd Sir Alogy 9.5 (10/1) K. Scott
3rd Mount Pleasant 10.0 (5/1) T. Butler. 2 ½ len x ½ len. Time 4:00
(course record)



5th 28/07/1928 Moonee Valley: Gelibrand Hurdle-2 miles
 8 ran – 9.0 (33/1) T. Tagell     
1st Sir Alogy 9.11 (5/4F) K. Scott – 2nd Autroilite 9.7 (15/1) H. O’Dwyer
3rd Lord Bounty 10.0 (7/1) G. Trukcett. ¾ len x 1 ½ len. Time 3:39 ¼
                                                                     

 7YO



9th 4/05/1929 Mentone: Brush Steeplechase-2miles 1f
12 ran – 9.0 (20/1) T. Tagell         
1st Patriotic 9.10 (9/2) E. Rawlings – 2nd Micronesia 11.1 (8/1) N. Mellroy
3rd Cobbin 9.6 (20/1) W. Howson. 2 len x ¾ len. Time 4:07



8th 11/05/1929 Sandown: Brush Steeplechase-2miles 1f 194yd
14 ran – 9.0 (33/1) W. Murrell
1st *Mungurra 9.9 (7/1) G. Smith – 1st *Winalone 9.7 (5/2F) R. Turner
3rd Naloori 9.10 (20/1) T. Chandler. *Dead-heat x 2 len. Time4:58 ½



WON 25/05/1929 Moonee Valley: Commonwealth Steeplechase-2 miles 8ch
12 ran - 9.2 (6/1) W. Murrell
2nd Micronesia 11.3 (7/1) N. McIlroy – 3rd Junot King 10.5 (10/1) W. Howson
8 len x 2 len. Time 4:32
Five of the dozen competitors in the Commonwealth Steeplechase failed to complete the course. Mosstrooper took the lead and though Micronesia ran up to him approaching the last fence (which they jumped together). Mosstrooper outstayed Micronesia and won comfortably. Derision shaped poorly.
Biologist (who ran off in the Brush Steeplechase at Sandown Park two weeks ago), completed the course, but was last home. Mosstrooper had revealed poor form at his last appearance at Sandown Park a fortnight ago, and it was a surprise today to find him backed from 15's to 6's. (Sunday Times Perth - 26/05/1929)


FELL 1/06/1929 Flemington: Hopetoun Steeplechase-2 miles ½f
9 ran - 9.8 (6/1) W. Murrell
1st Sandhurst 11.11 (5/1) R. Inkson – 2nd Parquin 10.3 (5/1) D. Wraight
3rd Glentronie 10.13 (10/1) D. Zeally. 1 len x 4 len. Time 4.03 ¼ 



WON 8/06/1929 Moonee Valley: Brunswick Steeplechase-2 miles 8 ch
11 ran – 9.8 (5/1) W. Murrell
2nd Nyangay 12.6 (3/1F) R. Mason – 3rd Glentronie 10.13 (7/2) D. Zeally.
10 len x 1 len. Time 4:21 ¼
Micronesia and Bright Flare were withdrawn, leaving eleven to contest the Brunswick Steeplechase. It was a battle between Nyangay and Glentronie for favoritism, but the honour lay with Nyangay at threes, Glentronie finishing up half a point longer. Mosstrooper was well supported, and others in the market were Longlands, Mungarra, the South Australian, Laurelmond, winner of the Great Eastern Steeplechase, and Aiver. As soon as the barrier rose, Mosstrooper ran to the front. Nyangay immediately took up a position handy to the leader, Glenlronie being just in front of him.
Before the first round was completed, Loch Eaton ran up to Mosstrooper, but the latter's jumping enabled him to retain the lead. Loch Eaton hung on, but was no match for Mosstrooper, who had a nice lead. Leaving the straight the second time, Glentronie lay third and Nyangay fifth, just behind the unfancied West Wing. It was apparent six furlongs from home that Glentronie could make little impression on Mosstrooper.
Nyangay made his run from the half mile, but was giving away too much weight, and was comfortably beaten by Mosstrooper, who is a much-improved jumper. As he has only 9.5 in the National, his prospects are now being taken more seriously. Nyangay was not disgraced, considering he was giving Mosstrooper 40 lbs. He will be improved by the run. The race should also do Glentronie good. (Burnie Advocate – 10/06/1929)






WON 29/06/1929 Moonee Valley: Travancore Hurdle-2 miles 8ch
10 ran – 10.6 (2/1F) W. Murrell
2nd Valbroy 9.4 (15/1) G. May - 3rd Micronesia 11.1 (9/2) N. McIlroy.
6 len x 2 len. Time 4:20
“Horses for courses” applies to Mosstooper and the Moonee Valley steeplechase course. Mosstrooper, at his last three starts at Moonee Valley, has been successful over fences. He is one of the most improved steeplechase horses in Victoria and despite his mishap at his only start over Flemington fences he had advanced to the position of equal favourite for the Grand National Steeplechase. And Mosstrooper is entitled to his forward position in the discussions, for in the Grand National he will carry 15lb. less than the weight with which he was successful in the Travencore Steeplechase at Moonee Valley on Saturday.
As Usual, Mosstrooper went to the front when the barrier rose but Selbourne went with him for a while. When Selbourne fell near the five and a half furlong post the first time around Mosstrooper was well clear of the others. He was not afterwards headed and at the finish he had six lengths to spare from Valbroy. Some racing men are inclined to detract from the merit of Mosstrooper’s performance. Their opinion is that if Micronesia had not hit hard and nearly lost is rider two fences from home he would have defeated Mosstrooper.
Micronesia was going well at the time, but Mosstrooper had plenty in reserve, and although Micronesia gained on him near the last fence, he was not troubled to move away again. Micronesia weakened in the straight and he finished two lengths behind Valbroy.
W. Murrell, rider of Mosstrooper, adopted tactics similar to those which he employed in Mosstrooper’s previous races at Moonee Valley. Leaving the straight the second time he forced the horse along to secure a commanding lead, and the others were left scrambling behind him. Wanda King was closer than usual to the early leaders, and for a long time he appeared likely to prove Mosstrooper’s most dangerous rival. He however, weakened over the last half mile.
Quick Deal was solidly backed but he did not jump with any brilliance, and although he struggled along fairly over the last half mile, he was narrowly beaten for third place. Grosvenor was a long way back throughout the race. Selbourne was remounted and he completed the course. 
('Doncaster' The Argus – 1/07/1929)





2nd 13/07/1929 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3 miles 1f
16 ran – 9.6 (7/1) W. Murrell
1st Sandhurst 11.4 (8/1) A. Fullerton - 3rd Seafit 10.11 (7/1) D. Wraight.
Nk x 2 len. Time 6:08 ¾ (course record)
  


5th 27/07/1929 Moonee Valley: Gellibrand Hurdle-2 miles
8 ran - 9.12 (6/1) W. Murrell
1st Rakwool 9.0 (8/1) G. May – 2nd Cobranveil 10.2 (7/2EF) R. Inkson
3rd Vanto 9.8 (7/2EF) J. Newton. 6 len x 2 len. Time 3:47



WON 31/07/1929 Aspendale Park: Hurdle Race-2 miles
14 ran – 10.9 (7/2EF) W. Murrell
2nd Sir Eaton 11.2 (9/2) T. Butler - 3rd Swig 9.4 (6/1) T. Lynch.
3 len x 2 len. Time 3:50 ½  
After Mosstrooper’s defeat in the hurdle race at Moonee Valley on Saturday, racegoers were inclined to think that the horse’s chances in the Australian Hurdle Race was very slight.
Now they have changed their opinions for at Aspendale Park yesterday, Mosstrooper won the hurdle race in really good style. He was a fair way back early, and his rider W. Murrell was forcing him along five furlongs from home. Mosstrooper struggled along well, and he took the lead at the top of the straight. In the run home he proved much too strong for the others, and at the finish he had three lengths to spare from Sir Eaton.
At Moonee Valley, Mosstrooper made two faulty jumps, and that spoiled his chances. But the experience improved him, and yesterday no fault could be found with his jumping. For a long time Waywode was favourite, and 9 to 2 was on offer against Mosstrooper, but at barrier rise Waywode and Mosstrooper shared favouritism at 7 to 2. Waywode was well placed for more than a mile, but over the last six furlongs he weakened badly, and he was a long way back when he fell at the last hurdle. The only other runner which failed to complete the course was King Rak, who dislodged his rider early in the race.
Sir Eaton, who finished second in the race displayed improvement. A protest entered on his behalf on the grounds of interference at the home turn was dismissed but it was not decided until just before the fourth race.
Sir Eaton is trained by G. Murrell a brother of W. Murrell, rider of the winner.
Mosstrooper now is among the favourites for the Australian Hurdle Race, and he appears to have an excellent chance, despite the fact that the field he defeated yesterday was weak and that the two miles took 3.50 ½ . In eight starts he has scored four wins and a second and even if he does not win the Australian Hurdle Race his owner, Mr G. Powell will be happy in the knowledge that he possesses a horse capable of giving him a great run for his money over either hurdles or fences.
Third place yesterday went to the improved Swig, and best of the others were Dookie and King Denham. 
('Doncaster' The Argus - 1/08/1929)



After the race at Aspendale, a protest was lodged against the winner by the rider of second-placed, Sir Eaton for alleged interference at the second last hurdle. Stewards dismissed the protest but acknowledged that Mosstrooper had caused interference to both Sir Eaton and Swig and disqualified his rider, W. Murrell for three months.

Notice was given that there would be no appeal against the stewards' decision in regard to the dismissal of the protest. Subsequently the stewards disqualified Murrell for six months, for improper conduct towards an official. The sentences to be concurrent.
Murrells suspension meant that Mosstrooper’s connections had to find another jockey to ride him in the Australian Hurdle at Caulfield in three days time.

With very little notice, H.J. ‘Bert’ Thompson found himself riding the equal-favourite in the Australian Hurdle.


William 'Bill' Murrell
                             

H.J. 'Bert' Thompson


                                                                   
                                                                     8YO


WON 3/08/1929 Caulfield: Australian Hurdle-3 ¼ miles 20yd
10 ran – 9.10 (4/1) H. Thompson
2nd Longlands 10.5 (8/1) R.N. Harris - 3rd Scudalong 9.0 (15/1) W. Nelson.      
5 len x 4 len. Time 6.16


Mosstrooper clears the last jump in the Australian Hurdle


















Throughout the early betting on the Australian Hurdle Race, May Day was a pronounced favorite. His position was assured when he beat Kentle in the Doutta Galla Hurdle Race at Flemington. May Day was previously fourth in the Grand National Hurdle Race, and, to many backers, the way seemed cleared for him when the placed horses in the Grand National — Kentle, Chumree and Bay of Biscay — passed over the Australian Hurdle Race. Little better than 3 to 1 was laid against May Day, and he started at 5 to 2. After his miserable failure in the Hurdle Race at Moonee Valley the previous week, there was a tendency to dismiss Mosstrooper from the calculations on the Australian Hurdle, although he was still in good demand for the Australian Steeplechase. Mosstrooper was given another chance to show up as a hurdler at Aspendale Park last Wednesday, and he improved so well on his Moonee Valley showing that he won, and he came into favor for the Caulfield event again. From much longer prices Mosstrooper shortened so much that on Saturday he started a firm second favorite to May Day at 4 to 1. There was also very heavy backing for Sir Eaton, who ran second to Mosstrooper at Aspendale Park, and Longlands, who went amiss before the Grand National, and had to dodge that race. – They started at 8 to 1, with Bavaroy and Sayles at 10 to 1. The outsiders of the party were Leontes and the Sydney candidate, Scudalong, who had been sent over especially for the race.
It seemed strange to many that two horses in the field of ten should lose many lengths at the start. There were 11 acceptors for the race, but Wanda King was withdrawn, and when the starter sent, them away, Longlands and Sir Eaton lost many lengths. Fortunately for them, there was little pace on and Sir Eton, pulling very hard, went to the front. Mosstrooper, who is a peculiar horse to ride, went very kindly for his new rider H. Thompson, and Thompson had little trouble to hold him in behind Sir Eaton.
Bavaroy was running third early, with Leontes and Cobranveil close up. Soon after turning out of the straight the first time, the field strung out in Indian file, with Sir Eaton leading Mosstrooper, and then followed in Bavaroy, Cobranveil, Sayles, Longland, Shanti, May Day, Scudalong and Leontes. There were no big intervals between the horses, and the riders seemed content to run along in that order for another round of the course, except for the fact that Cobranveil dropped back gradually until he was second last when they set out on the last round.
As soon as they turned out of the straight for the last round, Mosstrooper began to close on Sir Eaton. He was only a length behind at the mile post, and after passing the six furlongs post, he drew level. Very soon after Sir Eaton began to drop back and Mosstrooper continued alone. Slowly but surely he increased his lead, while behind him the riders began to make definite moves. May Day moved up from second last at the mile post, and Longlands commenced a forward move. Coming down the railway side, Mosstrooper had a handy lead from Sir Eaton and Longlands, but Longlands left Sir Eaton coming to the turn, and set out after Mosstrooper.
Rounding the turn, Longlands was only two lengths behind Mosstrooper, and he seemed to be gaining, but as soon as they jumped the last hurdle, Mosstrooper began to draw away again, and he had five lengths to spare at the judge's box. Scudalong, who had been in Melbourne less than a week, caused great surprise by coming home with a well sustained run into third place, four lengths behind Longlands. Cobranveil did better over the last six furlongs than he had been doing earlier in the race, and he finished fourth, about eight lengths behind Scudulong. Sir Eaton was fifth and May Day sixth. Sir Eaton found his task of trying to lead all the way too great, but he ran well while May Day found the distance beyond him. He was very tired at the finish. In fact, his finishing effort recalled his weak effort in the Grand National Hurdle Race, when he ran up to the leaders at the last hurdle, but then failed to come on. He would improve greatly if left in Melbourne to race, for he seems to require racing against top-notch horses to bring the best out of him.
Leontes, Bavaroy, and Sayles followed May Day, but not one of them ever appeared likely to have a chance. Shanti knocked up badly, and finished a bad last. Throughout the long journey the horses jumped the hurdles very cleanly, and they all completed the course.  Mosstrooper nearly made a hash of his hurdling again, for in the early stages he jumped in every way but the correct one. After about a mile he warmed up to it well, and he did not put a foot wrong after that.
 It would be hard to recall just how many times important races have been won by riders having a chance mount. H. Thompson, who rode Mosstrooper, had no idea on Friday that he was to ride the gelding. When Mosstrooper's usual rider was disqualified at Aspendale Park, it became necessary to find another to take the mount. At first, A. Fullarton was engaged, but the owner forgot that Fullarton would have to ride Sandhurst in the Steeplechase, and that he would not be able to ride Mosstrooper. He was anxious to have the same rider for both races, and he asked Fullarton to forego the mount, promising him a good reward should Mosstrooper win the Hurdle. The owner then approached E. Webster, and that rider agreed to accept the mount in both races. There was another disappointment for Mr. PowelL when Webster was taken suddenly ill on Friday morning, and had to give up the idea of riding the gelding. There was a frantic search, then, for a rider, and it was not until late on Friday night that Mr. Powell was able to secure the services of H. Thompson.  (‘Clifden’ The Referee 7/08/1929)


Mosstrooper cruises past the post in the Australian Hurdle
















WON 10/08/1929 Caulfield: Australian Steeplechase-3 ½ miles
7 ran - 10.9 (2/1F) H. Thompson
2nd Seafit 11.5 (4/1) T. Butler - 3rd Namera 10.11 (7/1) S. Warner.
3 len x 2 ½ len. Time 7:00 ½

Mosstrooper leads the field past the stand in the Australian Steeplechase


It was generally regarded that Mosstrooper had something of a mortgage on the Australian Steeplechase, despite the fact that he had gone up 10lb for his second in the National. He won the Australian Hurdle Race in such good style, and it was known that he was a jumper above the ordinary, so it was not surprising that the bookmakers had him at 5 to 2 after his win in the first leg of the Caulfield double. On the course, twos was the best price on offer, and he started at that price. Seafit was well backed against Mosstrooper and he started second favourite at 4 to 1, with Sandhurst at 5 to 1. Willanjie, who came in for very heavy backing on the course, started at 11 to 2, after as much as 8 to 1 had been laid.
Generally the field for the Australian Steeplechase was regarded as being disappointing, for there were only seven acceptors, but those who regarded the field in that light apparently failed to realise that the first six horses to finish in the Grand National Steeplechase were in the field, and, in addition, Epergne, who seemed likely to run fourth or fifth in the Grand National when he came down at the last fence, was also a runner.
After the manner in which Sandhurst had spread-eagled the field in the Grand National Steeplechase at Flemington, it came as a surprise to see his rider, Fullerton, restrain him when the field was sent away. Apparently, Fullerton was riding to instructions, but it seemed like a suicidal policy to restrain Sandhurst when his undoubted jumping ability was his strongest claim to fame as a steeplechaser. Anyhow, the absence of a pacemaker gave H. Thompson on Mosstrooper little worry, for he allowed Mosstrooper to stride to the front and set a good pace. Mosstrooper had won three steeplechases at Moonee Valley in that manner, and in the race on Saturday, he apparently relished the lead. He jumped as though enjoying it all, and he gave Thompson a very easy ride.
Just how foreign it all was to Sandhurst to be restrained in his jumping was shown when he made an awful jump at the first fence the second time round, and he came down. Willanjie also made a shocking attempt at the fence, and he also came down. At that stage Mosstrooper was leading, but George William was trying to go with him. George William took off at nearly every fence on the first round with Mosstrooper, but Mosstrooper out-jumped him every time. When Willanjie came down, he was level with George William two lengths behind Mosstrooper, and Sandhurst was about three lengths farther back.
Throughout the first round, Namera had been dropping farther and farther back, until he was a bad last, and Seafit’s rider was taking things very easily also, allowing his mount to fall back second last. When Willanjie and Sandhurst went, there were only five left in it, and George William followed Mosstrooper with Epergne third to the turn into the straight the second time. There Epergne ran into second place, with George William third, then, after a gap, Seafit, with Namera still a long way back.
As they set out on the last round, the riders of Seafit and Namera started to move, but they had a lot of ground to make up. With only nine furlongs to go, Thompson stole a look around, and, apparently seeing Seafit and Namera so far away, decided to make things all the harder for them. He increased the pace and George William dropped out of it.
Epergne continued in second place, but Seafit ran into third place about six furlongs from home, and appeared to be going well.  Namera also passed George William, but he and Seafit still had to give Mosstrooper a long start. A sudden change came over the race about five furlongs from home. Seafit seemed to be going better and better, and he deposed Epergne from second place. At the half mile post, he was only three lengths behind Mosstrooper, and he made up some ground while jumping the three fences between the half-mile and the turn into the straight. While jumping those fences Namera, too, battled along past Epergne, who had had enough, and Mosstrooper came to the turn about a length in front of Seafit, with Namera about eight lengths farther back. On the turn, Thompson tried Mosstrooper with one kick, and he apparently had a lot in reserve, for he increased his lead to about three lengths before they straightened up. That advantage he maintained to the post without undue effort, and he beat Seafit home by three lengths. Namera was running along at the finish less than three lengths behind Seafit, but it would have been the same had the race been over ten miles — Namera would have still been running on. Epergne was a poor fourth and George William was going up and down in the one place almost when he finished a very bad last.
To lead all the way over the three and a half miles was a great feat in itself, but when it is considered that he got in very close to the first of the treble on the railway side the second time round, and struck it with his chest, cleverness must also be added to his box of tricks. He made a very clever recovery, and landed well, and the next two fences he jumped perfectly, having learnt a lesson from his one mistake. At all of the other fences he did not put a foot wrong, and he was so fresh at the end, that be took off a long way from the last fence, and made a splendid jump (‘Clifden’ The Referee – 14/08/1929)


4th 14/09/1929 Moonee Valley: Steeplechase-2 ½ miles 
11 ran – 12.3 (7/2) H. Thompson
1st Chaumont 10.5 (8/1) S. Warner – 2nd Valbroy 9.5 (10/1) N. McIlroy 
3rd Gulyarri 10.9 (10/1) R. Turner. Hd x lg/nk. Time 4:58 ¾ (race record)




3rd 7/06/1930 Flemington: York Hurdle-2 miles
10 ran - 10.9 (16/1) R.N. Harris 
1st Horoscope 10.11 (7/2) R. Inkson – 2rd Tirade 9.7 (5/1) D. Zeally.
¾ len x 3 len. Time 3:49 ½



3rd 21/06/1930 Caulfield: Toolambool Hurdle-2 miles 65yds                          
13 ran – 10.10 (6/1) R.N. Harris                                                                                  
1st Swahilli 9.7 (8/1) W. Howson – 2nd Gipsy Verse 10.11 (10/1) W. McInnes.
2 len x 1 ¼ len. Time 3:43 ¾ 




2nd 28/06/1930 Williamstown: Port Phillip Hurdle-2 miles
9 ran – 10.11 (6/1) R.N. Harris
1st Swahilli 10.5 (5/2F) W. Howson – 3rd Bay Of Biscay 10.2 (9/2) L. Sheppard.
2 len x 1 ½ len. Time 3:38 (course record)




WON 5/07/1930 Flemington: Grand National Hurdle-3 miles 
11 ran – 10.7 (2/1F) R.N. Harris
2nd Johnny Cake 9.7 (20/1) T. Butler - 3rd Tirade 9.2 (9/2) D. Zeally.
4 len x 2 ½ len.   Time 5:51 ½    


Mosstrooper leads Johnny Cake and Tirade over the last hurdle

















When the day for the Grand National Hurdle came round, Mosstrooper was the best favorite, and he advanced even further in popularity, until he was quoted at 2 to I at the start of the race, with 4 to 1 on offer against Swahilli, who was second favorite. Mosstrooper hardened from 3 to 1 on the course, and Swahilli eased from 7 to 2. Another well-backed horse on the course was Tirade, who firmed from 7 to 1 until he was firm at 9 to 2. The money simply poured in for Tirade, who was backed as though it were all over. The backing of Tirade and Mosstrooper on the course had the effect of causing the prices on offer against the majority of the others to ease considerably, except in the case of Bay of Biscay, who maintained his overnight quotation of 6 to 1. In a field of eleven, 10 to 1 bar four was on offer, and only two others were quoted at less than 20 to 1.
Backers of Swahilli had a very poor run. This gelding has previously shown a dislike for the hurdles at Flemington, and very early in the race on Saturday he showed that he had not gained any greater liking for them since his successes at Caulfield and Williamstown. At the first hurdle he pecked badly, and he rapped the next two, so that his backers must have lost hope even then. Swahilli did not get very far, as the hurdle after passing the five furlongs post the first time claimed him, and he sprawled over very awkwardly. As he fell he interfered with Olina, who came down over him. That accident reduced the field to nine, of whom Solo Flight and Rumford were going badly, and were beaten off. Passing the stand the first time, after completing one round, Johnny Cake and Bay of Biscay were together in front of Horoscope with Tresolaus next, about a length in front of Rossgole, Mosstrooper, and Tirade, who were in line. It was a well-bunched field as they turned out of the straight, but Bay of Biscay Jumped away from Johnny Cake soon after.
As soon as Bay of Biscay went away from Johnny Cake, Harris decided not to allow him to get too far away, and he moved Mosstrooper up until, at the seven furlongs post, Bay of Biscay led Tresolaus and Mosstrooper by two and a half lengths. Johnny Cake and Horoscope, in the meantime, had each made a faulty jump, for which they lost some ground. Mosstropper was a close second to Bay of Biscay when they reached the five furlongs post, and it seemed as though he had the South Australian well covered when Bay of Biscay made a mistake and toppled over. That left Mosstrooper with a commanding lead over Tresolaus and Johnny Cake, who was going well, Tresolaus then began to tire, and by the time they began to make the turn there were only three with chances. Mosstrooper was then three lengths in front of Johnny Cake, with Tirade a similar distance back. Approaching the last hurdle, just inside the straight. Zealley had Tirade hugging the rails and gaining on the leaders, until, when Mosstrooper jumped the last, he was only two lengths in front of Johnny Cake and Tirade. There was a hush in the crowd as the race was very interesting there. Any of the three had a chance, but Mosstrooper then set all minds at rest by shooting away. Over the last furlong he appeared to hang out a little, but at the post he had four lengths to spare from Johnny Cake, while Tirade was two and a half' lengths farther back, third.
Mosstrooper's rider said after the race that although it appeared that Mosstrooper was hanging out, it was really due to a large number, of people rushing down near to the fence to cheer him and he turned his head round to the outside to look at them. The unplaced horses were well beaten. Tresolaus filled fourth place, but was 20 lengths behind Tirade, while Horoscope was even a greater distance farther back, fifth. Rossgole followed Horoscope, and there were long intervals separating Rumford and Solo Flight, who also finished. With only eleven starters, the field was one of the smallest in the history of the race. The same number went to the post when Berrinbo won in 1923 and it was the smallest field since 1887 when The Yeoman won.                                              (‘Clifden’ The Referee – 9/07/1930)    



WON 12/07/1930 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3miles 1f 
14 ran – 11.10 (7/1) R.N. Harris 
2nd Namera 10.13 (9/2F) R. Inkson - 3rd Glentronie 9.13 (33/1) W. Howson.
4len x 3 len. Time 6:28 ½  



Mosstrooper leads Woomera and Kentle in the Grand National Steeplechase















Expectations that the race would be one of the most interesting of the Nationals ever seen were centred mainly in the hope that Nightlark would make a merry pace again and that Sandhurst would go after him all the way. The expectations were realised to a certain extent, but Nightlark disappointed in the amount of lead that he did obtain. He did not take his fences with his customary dash and the result was that the greatest lead that he ever had was about ten lengths. Good Whiskey chased Nightlark over the first three fences, but after they had gone six furlongs of their three miles journey, Sandhurst was in second place. Nightlark hurdled the fences all the way to the turn into the straight, where he was about ten lengths in front of Sandhurst, but he showed an aversion to the five jumps in the straight again and he lost the greater part of his lead. In fact, Nightlark was only a little more than a length in front of Sandhurst when they started to jump the three fences along the river-side the second time, and when they reached the third of them Nightlark had had enough. He toppled over there, but his fall was brought about by weariness.
Sandhurst then continued with the lead until they were about six furlongs from home, where Mosstrooper went past him, and led him over 'Jumbo' by two lengths. From there it was no race, as Mosstrooper bowled along in front and ran home a nice winner by four lengths from Namera. Throughout the race Mosstrooper was keeping handy to the leaders. After the first three fences he was never further back than fourth, and, passing the stand after having completed one round, he seemed to have those in front of him safely covered. He showed that his racing over hurdles in preparation for and racing in the Grand National Hurdle did not make him forget how to jump the bigger fences. His jumping of the stand treble was a treat to watch, and it was this splendid jumping which enabled him to get within two lengths of Nightlark and Sandhurst soon after leaving the straight.
Over the treble in front of the abattoirs, near the seven furlongs post, his jumping again served him well, for it was that which enabled him to join Sandhurst soon after jumping the last of them. It was at the abattoirs treble that his backers had their only worry. When he ran up to within three lengths of Sandhurst, Adit ranged up on the outside of him, and when Adit screwed at the second of the treble and fell underneath Mosstrooper many thought that he would be brought down. But Mosstrooper is nothing if not clever. The mishap had little effect on him, and he gained his balance again in a few strides.
It was a very easy matter to run Sandhurst down, but his rider could not afford to take any risks with him, and he kept him going. It was just as well that he did, for there were some old battlers behind him ready to run it out to the very last. Among them were Namera and Glentronie, and they finished on very well to get the minor placings, but not quite well enough to make any impression on Mosstrooper in the straight. Namera, in running into second place, added further to his wonderful record in the Grand National Steeplechase, and now he has won the event once, run second twice, third once and sixth once. In a few weeks he will be aged 12 years, but he retains his form in a remarkable manner. Year in and year out he races through the autumn, winter, and spring, without ever showing the effects of his long and tiring journeys over fences, and, in fact, on appearances, he is as good this year as over he was. No horse can boast of having started in five successive nationals and having been placed in four. Glentronie, in running third, showed the best, form of his career. He jumped splendidly throughout, and was always in a handy enough position. The heavy going, combined with the fact that he had to carry 12.6 pulled Sandhurst up over the last 3 furlongs, and his rider did not knock him about when he saw that he could not hold Mosstrooper. At the same, time it must be conceded that he did splendidly to run fourth.

Good Whiskey showed excellent form by running fifth, as he was always in the picture, and only failed over the last half-mile. The only other to complete the course was Orange Park, but he was always near the tail of the field, and, although he jumped safely, he put no dash into it. Eight of the 11 runners failed to get round. Hungarian was the first to go. He got over six fences safely, but 'Jumbo' apparently caused him to wonder, for he refused to take it the first time round. The next, to go was Kentle, who fell heavily at the first fence in, the lane. Kentle was the cause of the next mishap, for he chased the field riderless until he reached the second of the stand treble, and then he ran down the fence in front of Merauki who tried to evade him but, in doing so, made a feeble attempt to jump, and landed on top of the stone wall with her forelegs on one side and her hind legs hanging over the other side. At the last of the stand treble Maxownit turned a complete somersault. The next two to go were Nightlark and Woomera. Nightlark was too tired to jump the last of the three fences on the river side near the mile post, and he toppled over, but nobody seems to know exactly what happened to Woomera. He tried to run these three fences down on the first round, and again on the second round he got down near the inside of the fences, until it seemed as though ho ran off at the last of them. Many thought that he jumped it and then pulled out.    I am inclined to think that he did not jump it and was pulled up. Adit was going very well alongside Mosstrooper when the second of the abattoirs treble, about six furlongs from home, claimed him, and the next fence claimed George William, who had had enough by that time. The possibilities of the race for those who fell boils down to the fact that Mosstrooper, Sandhurst, Namora, and Glentronle had the others beaten when they came down, with the possible exception of Kentle and Adit. When Adit fell he seemed to be the only danger to Mosstrooper, but Kentle went so early that it would be hard to tell how he would have shaped. He was well up when he went, and had jumped the others very well. (‘Clifden’ The Referee – 16/07/1930)


9YO



WON 2/08/1930 Caulfield: Australian Hurdle-3 ¼ miles 20yds 
10 ran – 11.12 (3/1F) R.N. Harris
2nd Lord Darnley 9.4 (12/1) A. Richards – 3rd Kentle 11.8 (7/1) E. Webster.
3 len x 4 len. Time 6:12 ½  

Mosstrooper leads Lord Darnley over the last in the Australian Hurdle
















Although the Australian Hurdle is run over a distance of approximately three and a quarter miles, usually a fast pace is set all the way. On this occasion the one who attended to the pacemaking was Rossgole. Apparently his connections considered the best chance for him was to set a solid pace, and thus carry the topweights off their feet. Rossgole tried to run down his hurdles when on his own, and consequently, was never able to get very far away. About a mile from home he was out about 12 lengths, but he tired soon after that, and was a very weary horse at the finish, his rider pulling him up after he had jumped the last hurdle. Throughout the race the greater portion of the crowd had eyes for Mosstrooper only. They watched him closely from start to finish, and it cannot be denied that he gave his admirers some anxious moments. Early, Harris allowed him to drop back to last, and he made no effort to move up until they were about a mile and a quarter from home. Turning out of the straight for the last round, Harris took Mosstrooper on the outside of the field, where there was little chance of interference and the gelding commenced to bridge the gap. At the mile Rossgole was out 12 lengths from Swahilli while Paul T, Reonui, and Mosstrooper were almost in line next. It was then that Mosstrooper's admirers had their greatest fright.
Rossgole lost his lead soon after, and Swahilli went past him, while Polygonum and Kentle began their efforts. Both of these horses passed Mosstrooper, who seemed to be laboring, but Harris must have been biding his time. He kept close behind Kentle as that gelding fol lowed Polygonum in the chase after Swahilli, and when Polygonum toppled over at the second last hurdle, Swahilli was only a few lengths In front of Kentle, with Mosstrooper a length farther back. Kentle appeared to 'lose ground in trying to dodge the fallen Polygonum, but it was no race after Mosstrooper had caught Swahilli on the turn. Mosstrooper simply drew away from Swahilli, and won by three lengths. Swahilli tired right out of it, and it was left to Lord Darnley to fill second place, with Kentle third.
Although the rider of Mosstrooper said that his mount seemed to be going well enough, except when bad jumpers interfered with, him at his hurdles, it cannot be said that he had such an impressive win as in his two races at Flemington. Two or three times he seemed to be in trouble, but he came on at the right end and that, after all, is what counts.
Apart from the winner the most impressive form was that of Lord Darnley. When the field had gone about a mile, Lord Darnley blundered badly and his rider made a remarkable recovery. That seemed to take all of the sting out of him and he kept Mosstrooper company at the tail of the field from then on. When Mosstrooper made his move about a mile and a quarter from home Lord Darnley seemed to be unable to go with him and he was still last five furlongs from home where the field was beginning to string out. From that stage Lord Darnley unwound a remarkable run which carried him past all but Mosstrooper. There was little between Kentle and Lord Darnley at the turn into the straight but Lord Darnley outstayed even this steady old plodder. At the post Lord Darnley was four lengths in front of Kentle who took third money. Reonui displayed great improvement on his previous efforts. Certainly he did not jump much better, but he mixed it with the smartest of them for the greater part of the journey and then came home fairly well to run fourth about four lengths behind Kentle.
For a son of Spearhead, Swahilli knocked up badly. He seemed to be going very nicely when he passed the tiring Rossgole about six furlongs from home and his breeding suggested that he would put up a better battle with Mosstrooper than he did. In the straight he could hardly raise a canter and finished fifth. Johnny Cake was sixth and Paul T. seventh, but the latter was about 20 lengths behind Johnny Cake. Paul T. also ran a good race while his stamina lasted, but the marathon distance found him out. Of those who finished, Diamond Plume was last, but Rossgole walked in behind the field, after having been pulled up at the last hurdle.

Of the ten horses which started nine safely negotiated the hurdles, the only one to fall being Polygonum, who came down at the second last jump when going very well. At that stage it seemed certain Polygonum would have shared in the prize money, although it is improbable he would have beaten the winner. In winning this race Mosstrooper attained the position of the greatest stake winner among Australian jumpers. A total of about £12,000 has been earned by him, and only a few odd pounds were won in flat races. A little more than £10,000 has been put together by him in the Australian Hurdle and Steeple and Grand Nationals. After his win, it was made known that Mosstrooper is unlikely to start in the Australian Steeple on Saturday. While it would have been a great feather in his cap to win the double for the second year, the penalty for his win on Saturday would bring his weight up to well over 13.0. After such a heavy campaign, it would be a heart-breaking task for him. Nobody doubts but that he would run well with the full penalty of 101b on his 12.10 but he has thoroughly earned a rest. (‘Clifden’ The Referee – 6/08/1930)



Mosstrooper was to have started in the Australian Steeplechase at Caulfield on the Saturday following his Australian Hurdle win, but was scratched the day before the race due to the sodden nature of the track. 
Constant rain during the week meant that the Caulfield track would be heavy for the Saturday meeting and Gus Powell wasn’t prepared to risk Mosstrooper on a bog track with 13.5 on his back. Mosstrooper was 5/2 favourite for the race at the time of his scratching.




FELL 20/06/1931 Caulfield: Toolambool Hurdle-2 mile 65yd
14 ran – 12.5 (14/1) R.N. Harris
1st Cockcrow 9.5 (7/2F) W. Howson - 2nd Olina 10.10 (6/1) R. Inkson
3rd Longlands 9.6 (12/1) H. Knevitt. 3 len x 2 ½ len. Time 3:47                                      
 
                        
                                     
3rd 4/07/1931 Flemington: Grand National Hurdle-3 miles
13 ran – 12.3 (11/2) R.N. Harris       
1st Cockcrow 9.3 (8/1) W. Howson - 2nd Olina 9.5 (11/2) D. Zeally.
5 len x 7 len. Time 6:09 ½ 



FELL 11/07/1931 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3 miles 1f
14 ran - 12.7 (5/1) R.N. Harris
1st Rakwool 11.7 (9/2F) R. Inkson - 2nd Kentle 11.9 (8/1) T. Dynon
3rd Best Man 9.2 (6/1) W. Howson. 20 len x 1 len. Time 6:35

Mosstrooper’s fall in the Grand National Steeplechase was the result of a badly twisted plate on his off hind foot which severely cut his off foreleg.
At first the injury was not considered to be serious and Mosstrooper was sent for a short spell to recover, but it soon became evident that he’d be out for the rest of the year.
Mosstrooper’s recovery was a slow one and prolonged lameness hampered his progress for many months, it was not until late January that he was fit enough to be put back into work.
In the end, Mosstrooper’s fall and resultant injury would keep him away from racing for almost ten months. 






                                               



                                                  10YO

6th 6/06/1932 Flemington: Marlborough Hurdle-2 ¼ miles
12 ran – 12.2 (20/1) H. Thompson
1st Nauru 11.2 (6/1EF) W. McInnes – 2nd Poidale 9.10 (7/1) T. Butler
3rd St. Magnus 9.2 (6/1EF) W. Howson. 5 len x 1 ½ len. Time 4:11 ¾



7th 25/06/1932 Williamstown: Port Phillip Hurdle-2 miles
13 ran – 12.1 (25/1) E. Webster
1st Redditch 11.12 (6/1) R. Inkson - 2nd Bay Of Biscay 10.9 (6/1) T. Butler
3rd Polygonum 9.9 (20/1) A. Fullerton. 2 len x 2 len. Time 3:44



9th 2/07/1932 Flemington: Grand National Hurdle-3 miles
19 ran – 12.2 (50/1) E. Webster
1st Polygonum 9.8 (14/1) A. Fullerton - 2nd Dunkeld 9.3 (16/1) W. Sandiford 
3rd Redditch 11.0 (7/1) R. Inkson. 6 len x 4 len. Time 5:45 ¾ 



3rd 9/07/1932 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3 miles 1f
13 ran – 12.7 (7/1) E. Webster
1st Precocious 9.8 (8/1) T. Lynch - 2nd Nauru 10.10 (8/1) R. Inkson.
7 len x ½ len. Time 6:18


                                                                                                                               

                                11YO



11th 6/08/1932 Caulfield: Australian Hurdle-3 ¼ miles 20yd
15 ran – 11.13 (33/1) E. Webster
1st Lord Darnley 9.2 (20/1) H. Thompson - 2nd Sarocto 9.0 (20/1) R. Sweetnam 
3rd - Shooting Boy 9.2 (9/2F) W. Nelson. 1 ¾ len x ¾ len. Time 6:09 ¾



FELL 13/08/1932 Caulfield: Australian Steeplechase-3 ½ miles
14 ran – 12.9 (15/1) E. Webster
1st Bang Bang 10.9 (15/1) R. Inkson – 2nd King’s Street 9.4 (15/1) A. Armsden
3rd Lord Darnley 10.3 (6/1) H. Thompson. 1 ¾ len x 10 len. Time 6:59 (race record)



6th 8/04/1933 Caulfield: Khartoum Hurdle-2 miles 65yds
8 ran – 10.10 (100/1) T. Butler 
1st Phocis 11.3 (7/4F) A. Fullerton - 2nd Bon Haven 9.10 (5/2) R. Hibbs
3rd Tezpur 10.8 (12/1) R. Inkson. 3 len x 3 len. Time 3:43 ½



9th 22/04/1933 Mentone: Brush Steeplechase-2 miles 1f
10 ran – 11.13 (25/1) T. Butler           
1st Redditch 12.7 (7/2) R. Inkson – 2nd Trilacre 11.7 (1-1F) R. Sweetnam
3rd Tabralong 9.12 (6/1) O. Cullum. 3 len x 10 len. Time 4:06



8th 13/05/1933 Moonee Valley: Brunswick Steeplechase-2miles 8ch
11 ran - 11.13 (50/1) T. Butler
1st More Noise 9.7 (8/1) A. Fullerton – 2nd Calfly 10.8 (6/1) D. Zeally
3rd Wirrate 10.13 (5/1) H. Jackson. 2 ½ len x 4 len. Time 4:23




2nd 17/06/1933 Caulfield: Wanda Steeplechase-2 mils 1 ¾f
8 ran – 11.7 (14/1) R. Sweetnam
1st The Cracksman 10.11 (5/2F) T. Butler – 3rd Widgiewa 9.5 (4/1) H. Cook.
½ len x 1 ½ len. Time 4:12 ¾ (course record)     

                          


2nd 1/07/1933 Flemington: Kensington Steeplechase-2 miles ½f
8 ran – 11.12 (5/2F) T. Butler
1st Jimball 9.4 (12/1) S. Warner – 3rd Lanilda 10.2 (9/2) D. Zeally.
Nk x 5 len. Time 4:00



3rd 8/07/1933 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3 miles 1f
8 ran – 12.3 (8/1) D. Zeally
1st Redditch 12.3 (7/4F) R. Inkson - 2nd The Cracksman 10.3 (7/2) T. Butler.           
8 len x 5 len. Time 6:05 (course record)



WON 15/07/1933 Caulfield: Godfrey Watson Steeplechase-2 miles 3f
6 ran - 12.6 (7/4F) R. Inkson
2nd Sarocto 9.6 (7/2) T. Dynon - 3rd Yantara 9.3 (8/1) J. Winks.
 2 ½ len x 5 len. Time 4:31 ¼  
When Mosstrooper entered the straight with a commanding lead in the Godfrey Watson Steeplechase at Caulfield on Saturday the applause for this great steeplechaser began, and it continued until the rider weighed in. Mosstrooper scored one of the most popular wins seen for a long time, and the reason was not the fact that he was favourite for the race. Racegoers were genuinely pleased to see the old champion win in his best style. Early in the race he was near the rear of the field, but even so he was closer than usual to the early leaders. Two fences from home he obtained a run on the inside of Yantara and George William, and he Jumped to the front. Subsequently he gave nothing a chance.
Sarocto made a forward move at the top of the straight. For a few strides he appeared dangerous, but he hung in behind Mosstrooper, and spoiled his chances. He finished two and a half lengths behind Mosstrooper, but was five lengths in front of the third horse, Yantara, who displayed pace on the flat, but lost ground at many of the fences. 
(Sydney Morning Herald – 17/07/1933)


                                          12YO



2nd 12/08/1933 Caulfield: Australian Steeplechase-3 ½ miles
9 ran – 11.11 (6/1) L.J. Hynes
1st Redditch 12.13 (1-1F) R. Inkson – 3rd George William 9.3 (15/1) R. McInnes. 
3 len x 6 len. Time 6:54 ¾


Mosstropper ends his illustrious career with a game second to Redditch in the Australian Steeplechase

















Mosstrooper was spelled after the Australian Steeple and Gus Powell was in two-minds whether to retire his champion or bring him back for a chance to add to his already outstanding record. Powell said that if Mosstrooper gave any indication while spelling that he could still be competitive, then he would not hesitate in putting him back into training.
Powell never got to make that decision, he died the following February and his family decided to call it a day with their gallant champion and retired Mosstrooper immediately to 'Netherlea' their Lysterfield property.
When Mosstrooper died he was buried at Netherlea and a headstone was placed on his grave. It is still there today.
The inscription reads:

Here Lies Mosstrooper
Best Horse Ever
1921 - 1946


                  Complete Career Record
       82 Starts - 11 wins 6 seconds 5 thirds 


2YO

12th 19/01/1924 Caulfield: Holiday Stakes-5 ½f
18th 16/02/1924 Caulfield: Federal Stakes-5f
8th 4/03/1924 Flemington: Hopeful Stakes 2nd Division-5f
8th 26/04/1924 Caulfield: Katandra 2YO-7f

3YO

7th 17/09/1924 Sandown: Sandown Park H’Cap- 1 mile
13th 4/10/1924 Caulfield: October Stakes- 1 mile 1f
6th 15/10/1924 Caulfield: Burwood Novice 2nd Division- 1 mile
2nd 23/11/1924 Albury: Hovell Tree Welter H’Cap-7f
L/RIDER 14/02/1925 Caulfield: Salisbury Welter-1 mile
7th 21/02/1925 Caulfield: St Clair Trial-1 mile 1f
8th 28/02/1925 Flemington: St Leger Stakes- 1 ¾ miles

4YO

15th 15/08/1925 Flemington: August Welter-1 mile
4th 28/08/1925 Ballarat: Dr. Spring H’Cap-1 mile
14th 5/09/1925 Caulfield: Warriston Welter-1 mile
12th 16/09/1925 Sandown: Trial Welter-1 mile

5YO

6th 19/02/1927 Caulfield: St. Clair Trial-1 mile 1f
9th 31/03/1927 Pakenham (Cranbourne): Maiden Plate 5 ½ f
8th 16/07/1927 Caulfield: Kambrook Trial 2nd Division-1 mile
12th 27/07/1927 Aspendale: Welter H’Cap- 9f

6YO

FELL 3/08/1927 Moonee Valley: Springvale Corinthian H’Cap-9 ½ f
8th 5/10/1927 Sandown: Doreen Corinthian H’Cap-1 mile
6th 13/10 1927 Cranbourne: Cranbourne Gold Cup-1 mile 110yd
5th 14/04/1928 Epsom: Brush Steeplechase-2 miles 15ch
4th 12/05/1928 Sandown: Brush Steeplechase-2 ¼ miles
WON 17/05/1928 Bendigo: Brush Steeplechase-2 miles
FELL 4/06/1928 Randwick: First Steeplechase-2 ¼ miles
FELL 9/06/1928 Randwick: AJC Club Steeplechase-3 miles
9th 21/07/1928 Caulfield: Leamington Hurdle-2 miles 1f 65yd
5th 28/07/1928 Moonee Valley: Gelibrand Hurdle-2 miles

7YO 

9th 4/05/1929 Mentone: Brush Steeplechase-2miles 1f
8th 11/05/1929 Sandown: Brush Steeplechase-2miles 1f 194yd
WON 25/05/1929 Moonee Valley: Commonwealth Steeplechase-2 miles 8ch
FELL 1/06/1929 Flemington: Hopetoun Steeplechase-2 miles ½f
WON 8/06/1929 Moonee Valley: Brunswick Steeplechase-2 miles 8 ch
WON 29/06/1929 Moonee Valley: Travancore Hurdle-2 miles 8ch
5th 10/07/1929 Flemington: Steeplechasers Flat Race-2 miles
2nd 13/07/1929 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3 miles 1f
5th 27/07/1929 Moonee Valley: Gellibrand Hurdle-2 miles
WON 31/07/1929 Aspendale Park: Hurdle Race-2 miles

                                   8YO

WON 3/08/1929 Caulfield: Australian Hurdle-3 ¼ miles 20yd
                     WON 10/08/1929 Caulfield: Australian Steeplechase-3 ½ miles
16th 7/09/1929 Caulfield: Warriston Welter-1 mile
4th 14/09/1929 Moonee Valley: Steeplechase-2 ½ miles
7th 27/01/1930 Williamstown: Steeplechasers Flat Race 1 ½ miles
14th 1/02/1930 Epsom: Epsom Purse-1 ½ miles
9th 24/05/1930 Williamstown: Beach Welter 1st Division-1 mile
14th 28/05/1930 Aspendale: Aspendale Purse-1 ¼ miles
3rd 7/06/1930 Flemington: York Hurdle-2 miles
3rd 21/06/1930 Caulfield: Toolambool Hurdl-2 miles 65yds
2nd 28/06/1930 Williamstown: Port Phillip Hurdle-2 miles
WON 5/07/1930 Flemington: Grand National Hurdle-3 miles
WON 12/07/1930 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3miles 1f
8th 29/07/1930 Sandown: Oakleigh Welter-1 ¼ mile


9YO

WON 2/08/1930 Caulfield: Australian Hurdle-3 ¼ miles 20yds
15th 31/01/1931 Epsom: Epsom Purse-1 ½ miles
8th 7/02/1931 Williamstown: February Trial-1 ¼ miles
10th 14/02/1931 Caulfield: Salisbury Welter 2nd Division-1 mile
9th 21/02/1931 Caulfield: St Clair Trial-9f
8th 7/03/1931 Flemington: Australian Cup-2 ¼ miles
13th 27/05/1931 Aspendale: Aspendale Purse-1 ¼ miles
9th 10/06/1931 Mentone: Mentone Purse-1 mile 2 ½ f
6th 17/06/1931 Epsom: Epsom Purse-1 ½ miles
FELL 20/06/1931 Caulfield: Toolambool Hurdle-2 mile 65yd
3rd 4/07/1931 Flemington: Grand National Hurdle-3 miles
FELL 11/07/1931 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3 miles 1f

10YO

9th 30/04/1932 Mentone: Welter Mile 1st Division-1 mile
17th 10/05/1932 Caulfield: John’s Welter 1st Division-7f
15th 21/05/1932 Williamstown: Beach Welter-1 mile
6th 6/06/1932 Flemington: Marlborough Hurdle-2 ¼ miles
7th 25/06/1932 Williamstown: Port Phillip Hurdle-2 miles
9th 2/07/1932 Flemington: Grand National Hurdle-3 miles
3rd 9/07/1932 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3 miles 1f

11YO

11th 6/08/1932 Caulfield: Australian Hurdle-3 ¼ miles 20yd
FELL 13/08/1932 Caulfield: Australian Steeplechase-3 ½ miles
6th 8/04/1933 Caulfield: Khartoum Hurdle-2 miles 65yds
9th 22/04/1933 Mentone: Brush Steeplechase-2 miles 1f
8th 13/05/1933 Moonee Valley: Brunswick Steeplechase-2miles 8ch
2nd 17/06/1933 Caulfield: Wanda Steeplechase-2 mils 1 ¾f
2nd 1/07/1933 Flemington: Kensington Steeplechase-2 miles ½f
3rd 8/07/1933 Flemington: Grand National Steeplechase-3 miles 1f
WON 15/07/1933 Caulfield: Godfrey Watson Steeplechase-2 miles 3f

12YO
2nd 12/08/1933 Caulfield: Australian Steeplechase-3 ½ miles

                               
'Best Horse Ever'




                         






















































    




                                            

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